1755 Tasting Notes

70
drank Yuzu Temple by Mariage Frères
1755 tasting notes

Clearly I’m going through allllllll my older stuff and having another try. This is, I think, the third oldest tea in my cupboard? Something like that. It’s another casualty of the time when I didn’t really like green tea, and it scared me a bit. I’m a lot braver now, though, and I actually quite like this blend. It’s a touch on the bitter side, with the yuzu peel, but the green tea is quite light and bright in flavour. It’s a good contrast. I really must remember not to let things languish!

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 30 sec 1 tsp

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80

This is another of the oldest teas still in my cupboard. I’m not actually sure why it’s lingered so long – I wasn’t the greatest genmaicha fan at first, but I’ve warmed to it over the last couple of years. I think initially it was just so outside my range of experience, and I wasn’t the biggest green tea fan anyway. These days, I can appreciate it for what it is. I also like the heritage that it has – it’s interesting to think that brown rice used to be added to tea in Japan to make the leaves stretch further, now I suspect genmaicha is mostly consumed for the experience or enjoyment of the flavour.

I have more experience of various genmaichas than I did when I first tried this one, and it’s clear to me that this is a good one. There’s an initial hit of toasty rice, which has a slightly bitter bent but not excessively so. It’s more sugar puffs than burnt toast. The apple emerges in the mid-sip, and it’s also got a baked flavour, slightly floury and a touch floral in the way that some apples are. The green tea is mostly present at the end of the sip, and it’s a touch vegetal with mostly seaweed/marine notes. It’s clean tasting, and it works nicely with the apple.

I like to return to teas I tried at the beginning of my tea journey from time to time, because I know my tastes are changing and it’s often surprising to compare an older note with a more recent one. I’ve increased my rating of this one based on today’s cup because qverall, I’m pretty pleased with this one. It stays fairly true to the spirit of genmaicha (it’s about 50/50 brown rice and green tea to look at the dry leaf), but with a modern, accessible twist in the form of the added apple. Definitely worth a try.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 30 sec 1 tsp

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90
drank Caramel Apple Oolong by 52teas
1755 tasting notes

I’m not sure how it is that I’ve only logged this one once. I half-remember writing more than one note about it, but maybe Steepster has eaten them. I wondered whether I wrote them for Caramel Apple Honeybush, but apparently I only logged that one once, too. The mind boggles.

I’ve definitely drank this one more than once, but at the moment I still have half a pouch left. I’ve been ignoring it recently in favour of other things, but I figured it deserved to come out again this morning. It’s a pretty perfect tea for cold days, and today is still really cold after yesterday’s snow. Fortunately there were no disasters on the way to work this morning.

I didn’t used to be the biggest oolong fan, and in some ways I’m still not, but flavoured teas like this one helped to convince me that there’s nothing really to be scared of. The caramel here is sweet and light, the apple is crisp and almost a little sour. It’s a great combination! The oolong base pokes through just a little, but I think it helps to develop the slightly burnt note of the caramel, while adding a light floral that some apples actually do have. A deliciously satisfying cup.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 45 sec 1 tsp

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100

Last night’s after dinner cup! I pulled out a stack of Bluebird teas when I went through my tea box on Sunday, so it’s no surprise that I’m starting to work through them. As ever, I only wish I’d done it sooner because this one. Is. Amazing. It smells great as soon as you open the pouch, but I’m always slightly wary of building up hopes at that point because scent and flavour are two entirely different things. I’ve learned this the hard way when it comes to tea and expectations. It’s not the case here, though, because this tea actually tastes like black forest gateau in a cup! I used 1.5 tsp of leaf, gave it a good 4 minutes in boiling water, and then added a splash of milk.

The initial flavour is cherry – concentrated black cherry, and a little syrupy. Second comes the chocolate – dark chocolate, rich and creamy. It has a lightness that really reminds me of sponge cake, although I have no idea how that’s achieved. Last of all is a hint of vanilla, which puts me very much in mind of the whipped cream topping a black forest gateau would have. Altogether, it’s pretty well a spot-on recreation in liquid form. I wasn’t expecting to be quite so impressed, but I’m more than glad that I am. This will definitely be a repurchase once I have my cupboard a little more in order. I’ve just placed an order with Bluebird for their new Spring collection anyway, so it’ll be a while yet I suspect.

One thing that did stand out to me is the sheer amount of different berries that went into this one – elderberries, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries and cranberries, but no cherry. I just found it interesting that the effect they create is so different from what they actually are, and that it took so many different berries to achieve it. There’s also apple and hibiscus, so go figure I guess. In some ways, Bluebird strike me almost as a smaller, UK version of David’s Tea. “All the ingredients”, huh? Given that it tastes this good, though, I’m not really complaining!

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp
Sil

Wow this sounds delicious!

tea-sipper

Thanks for your note on this one! I’ve wanted to try this since it was released!

Scheherazade

It’s well worth a try. Totally delicious!

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95

I picked up another sample pouch of this one with my last Bluebird order, really just to refresh my memory of it. I remember enjoying it, but hardly any of the specifics. I finally got around to opening it last night, and brewed up a cup as my pre-bedtime tea. It’s as good as I hoped, except to say that it’s more chocolatey than I remembered and less minty. Both are there, but the chocolate really dominates. It’s quite a sweet milk chocolate flavour, too, doubtless aided by the melting of those adorable chocolate hearts scattered throughout. If you like sweet chocolate things, this is for you. It’s an excellent caffeine-free treat.

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 45 sec 1 tsp

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45
drank Turtle Cheesecake by 52teas
1755 tasting notes

This was on my list of teas to come back to as it had that alcoholic niff when I first opened the pouch, and it kind of pervaded my first cup. It still hasn’t faded entirely, but it was much improved this morning on what it had been. I tried another cup – 1 tsp of leaf for 3 minutes in boiling water, splash of milk. It’s a pretty decent chocolate caramel tea, but I’m not getting cheesecake at all. That’s a shame, but not entirely unexpected.

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp

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95
drank Vanilla Matcha by DAVIDsTEA
1755 tasting notes

I have about two servings left of this one, so I decided to try one of them whisked into a glass of orange juice this morning for a change from my usual latte. I used 3/4 tsp and a large (250ml?) glass of juice. I did wonder whether the orange juice would drown out the matcha completely, but it doesn’t seem to have. To be honest, it’s mostly the vanilla I can taste but that’s okay with me (especially first thing!) The combination does have a decent creamsicle vibe going on, so I’m pretty content with how it worked out. It’s sweet, refreshing, and palatable which is all I want right now really.

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95
drank Vanilla Matcha by DAVIDsTEA
1755 tasting notes

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85

This is what I decided on for today after everything happened this morning. I’ve heard really, really good things about this pu’erh, and it’s been long overlooked in my cupboard. I’m using 1 tsp of leaf for this session, which had an initial rinse of 1 minute in water just cooled from boiling.

First steep is for 1 minute in water just cooled from boiling. The rinse liquor was fairly strongly scented and fishy, so I was wary with my first steep. It turns out that I needn’t have been – the flavour here is pretty delicate and the fishiness has gone completely. The best way to describe this would be “earthy cream”. It’s smooth and sweet with an underlying creaminess, but the main flavour is light forest floor/wet leaf, hence “earthy”. There’s a mild camphor-like coolness after successive sips.

Second steep also for one minute, in boiling water. The flavour this time is a little less distinctively earthy, with amped up cream notes and a touch of brown sugar/molasses in the mid-sip. Interestingly, the scent is still very earthy, but it’s not really coming out in the flavour. I’ve no problem with that, though – cream and brown sugar are just fine with me!

Lunch beckons, but I’ll be returning to this one later…

Third Steep for two minutes in boiling water. The liquor is much darker this time – a red-brown rather than an orange-brown. The flavour seems to have developed a little, too, and is now nuttier (I’m thinking walnut or hazelnut), with a caramel note lurking in the background. There’s still a touch of molasses, and the same distinctive creaminess. The earthiness is back very slightly, but is confined mostly to the aftertaste. I’m guessing the longer steep time encouraged this to re-emerge.

Fourth steep also for two minutes in boiling water. The earthiness has disappeared again, but the lightly sweet creaminess remains, with hints of brown sugar. Some of the intensity has worn off that flavour now, so I wouldn’t really call it molasses anymore. Brown sugar for sure, though. One thing I really like about this one is how it seems to get smoother with each successive steep. It was already pretty smooth to start with, but now it’s even more so. Silky, mildly sweet, sugar/cream amazingness.

Fifth steep for 3 minutes in boiling water, and it’s possibly the most amazing yet. It’s really sweet, with a distinctive creaminess and strong brown sugar notes, also a touch of vanilla. There’s no earthiness at all, and it’s the silkiest, smoothest thing that’s passed my lips in a long, long time. I know 3 minutes was recommended for this one, and I can definitely see why. I’m still over-cautious when it comes to pu’erh, though, especially the early steeps, thanks to a couple of fairly dodgy experiences. I’m going to have to think about what to do with my next cup, and whether to start with a longer steep straight off? Maybe it’s time to be brave again.

I had hoped to get six steeps of this one completed – two each at one, two and three minutes. I’m almost out of time unless I take the leaves home with me, though, and in all honesty I’m not going to faff around doing that. I’ve had a good time with this tea today, though – it’s kept me company without the need for milk, and has been utterly delicious all the way through. I’m really glad I picked up a pouch of this one, and only sad I didn’t get around to trying it sooner.

Preparation
1 tsp

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100

The next few days are clearly going to be Whispering Pines days, now they’ve emerged from their confinement in the deep, dark depths of “the box”. After my success with Imperial Gold Bud Dian Hong last night, I skipped straight to this one. I actually managed to recover all of the excitement and anticipation I originally felt when I first ordered this one, and it was nice to feel that way again. I used 1.5 tsp of leaf for my cup, and gave it 4 minutes in boiling water, no additions.

This has got to be one of the best tasting flavoured dessert teas I’ve ever tried. The initial sip is thick, heavy black cherry syrup – sweet, fruity, kirsch-like. The mid-sip adds distinctive notes of dark chocolate; rich and cocoa-like, and a perfect pairing with the cherry. The end of the sip brings sweet, creamy vanilla and just a hint of cinnamon. It’s a perfect combination of flavours, each enchancing the other to create a truly decadent taste experience. I’ve missed Whispering Pines, it’s true. I can’t wait to have another cup of this one!

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp

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Profile

Bio

Hi :) I’m Sarah, 28, and I live in Norfolk in the UK. My tea obsession began when a friend introduced me to Teapigs a good few years ago now. Since then, I’ve been insatiable. Steepster introduced me to a world of tea I never knew existed, and my goal is now to TRY ALL THE TEAS. Or most of them, anyway.

I still have a deep rooted (and probably life-long) preference for black tea. My all-time favourite is Assam, but Ceylon and Darjeeling also occupy a place in my heart. Flavoured black tea can be a beautiful thing, and I like a good chai latte in the winter.

I also drink a lot of rooibos/honeybush tea, particularly on an evening. Sometimes they’re the best dessert replacements, too. White teas are a staple in summer — their lightness and delicate nature is something I can always appreciate on a hot day.

I’m still warming up to green teas and oolongs. I don’t think they’ll ever be my favourites, with a few rare exceptions, but I don’t hate them anymore. My experience of these teas is still very much a work-in-progress. I’m also beginning to explore pu’erh, both ripened and raw. That’s my latest challenge!

I’m still searching for the perfect fruit tea. One without hibiscus. That actually tastes of fruit.

You’ve probably had enough of me now, so I’m going to shut up. Needless to say, though, I really love tea. Long may the journey continue!

My rating system:

91-100: The Holy Grail. Flawless teas I will never forget.

81-90: Outstanding. Pretty much perfection, and happiness in a cup.

71-80: Amazing. A tea to savour, and one I’ll keep coming back to.

61-70: Very good. The majority of things are as they should be. A pleasing cup.

51-60: Good. Not outstanding, but has merit.

41-50: Average. It’s not horrible, but I’ve definitely had better. There’s probably still something about it I’m not keen on.

31-40: Almost enjoyable, but something about it is not for me.

11-30: Pretty bad. It probably makes me screw my face up when I take a sip, but it’s not completely undrinkable.

0-10: Ugh. No. Never again. To me, undrinkable.

Location

Norfolk, UK

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