85

Drafting this note as I drink the tea. I drew from Leafhoppers and Lucky Me notes, and well, sense and instinct. I’ll add more as I drink it throughout the day, so expect some changes and edits.

Dryleaf is fruity and creamy, bordering on reminding me of sugarcane. First steep was a rinse, and it’s very sweet. Sweet corn, butter, honeydew (faint), sugar.

Second one after 25 seconds….flower water. Not much of anything.

Wet leaf smells like strawberries and cream. Third about 35 ish seconds in 4 ish oz, and more corn and whatever creamy floral. “Berries and cream,” osmanthus, melon of some form and something else. I’m feeling a little unoriginal, but I am liking this more than I thought I would. The vegetals might come soon, but so far, not so much. We’ll see as the session continues.

Now, 30-40ish seconds (maybe less), PEACH, orchids, osmanthus. Some green alpine-ness in the earlier part, barely vegetal. Very fresh and juicy.

Another round I did not count, probably close to less than a minute, and peach, but more floral. Orchid, herbs, osmanthus, and peachy finish.

47 seconds and heavy fruity aroma. Thick. Tasting it, thick fruit. Peach, jasmine, butter, and cantelope? More melon than peach personally. Immensely fruity.

And I think I’m ready for the waiting. Corn, peach, melon, cream, and florals are prominent for me. I felt very off for the florals though they are clearly present. I’ve been half tempted to write hyacinth for steep two, but I wasn’t sure. It could be the way I brewed it, but it was not as vegetal as the Fall A selection. This one was softer in comparison, though I didn’t expect it to be fruitier. I actually liked this one a little bit more despite it being more subdued. I also think it’s due to a little bit less leaves that I used, or I could be wrong. I’ll write a few things more soon, but I think I’ve gotten what I could out of the tea. Or have I?

Next steep. Vegetal spinach. Floral, but green, buttery, savory and herbaceous.

Flavors: Butter, Corn Husk, Floral, Fruity, Herbaceous, Herbs, Honeysuckle, Osmanthus, Peach, Sugarcane, Sweet

Leafhopper

I’m now wondering if I mislabelled these teas, though I don’t think I did. I have 35 g of this to get through, so I might try your longer steeping method or LuckyMe’s ambient brewing.

Daylon R Thomas

I was trying to think what the heck he meant by “ambient” lol. I’m fairly certain it’s the same tea. Like I said, this one was a little bit more subdued than A. I used the entirety of the sample in the instant though, and the only real difference I noticed in our brewing was the fact that I kept it short for a longer bit. I also might be ignoring the more herbaceous qualities for “Oh fruit!!!! I can taste fruit!”

Leafhopper

I assumed “ambient brewing” was bowl steeping the leaves in room-temperature water. The only thing I have that’s remotely like a tea bowl is my ~200 ml cup I use during gongfu sessions. My next smallest vessel is a 355 ml mug.

I usually glom on to the fruity notes as well, so it’s weird I didn’t get as many of them.

Daylon R Thomas

Corn is also kind of a vegetal note, too.

Leafhopper

That’s true, although I always interpret it as being sweeter than most veggies. Sometimes the corn I get in high mountain teas is like the really sweet cream corn nibblets from a can.

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Leafhopper

I’m now wondering if I mislabelled these teas, though I don’t think I did. I have 35 g of this to get through, so I might try your longer steeping method or LuckyMe’s ambient brewing.

Daylon R Thomas

I was trying to think what the heck he meant by “ambient” lol. I’m fairly certain it’s the same tea. Like I said, this one was a little bit more subdued than A. I used the entirety of the sample in the instant though, and the only real difference I noticed in our brewing was the fact that I kept it short for a longer bit. I also might be ignoring the more herbaceous qualities for “Oh fruit!!!! I can taste fruit!”

Leafhopper

I assumed “ambient brewing” was bowl steeping the leaves in room-temperature water. The only thing I have that’s remotely like a tea bowl is my ~200 ml cup I use during gongfu sessions. My next smallest vessel is a 355 ml mug.

I usually glom on to the fruity notes as well, so it’s weird I didn’t get as many of them.

Daylon R Thomas

Corn is also kind of a vegetal note, too.

Leafhopper

That’s true, although I always interpret it as being sweeter than most veggies. Sometimes the corn I get in high mountain teas is like the really sweet cream corn nibblets from a can.

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First Off, Current Targets:

Whispering Pines Alice
Good Luxurious Work Teas
Best Sachet Teas
Spring, Winter Taiwan High Mountain Oolongs

Dislikes: Heavy Tannin, Astringency, Bitterness, or Fake Flavor, Overly herby herbal or aged teas

Picky with: Higher Oxidation Oolongs, Red Oolongs (Some I love, others give me headaches or are almost too sweet), Mint Teas

Currently, my stash is overflowing. Among my favorites are What-Cha’s Lishan Black, Amber Gaba Oolong, Lishan Oolong, Qilan Oolong, White Rhino, Kenya Silver Needle, Tong Mu Lapsang Black (Unsmoked); Whispering Pines Alice, Taiwanese Assam, Wang’s Shanlinxi, Cuifeng, Dayuling, Jasmine Shan Lin Xi; Beautiful Taiwan Tea Co.“Old Style” Dong Ding, Mandala Milk Oolong; Paru’s Milk Oolong

Me:

I am an MSU graduate, and current alternative ed. high school social studies and history teacher. I formerly minored in anthropology, and I love Egyptian and classical history. I love to read, write, draw, paint, sculpt, fence(with a sword), practice calisthenics on rings, lift weights, workout, relax, and drink a cuppa tea…or twenty.

I’ve been drinking green and black teas ever since I was little living in Hawaii. Eastern Asian influence was prominent with my friends and where I grew up, so I’ve been exposed to some tea culture at a young age. I’ve come a long way since I began on steepster and now drink most teas gong fu, especially oolong. Any tea that is naturally creamy, fruity, or sweet without a lot of added flavoring ranks as a must have for me. I also love black teas and dark oolongs with the elusive “cocoa” note. My favorites are lighter Earl Greys, some white teas like What-Cha’s Kenyan offerings, most Hong-Cha’s, darker Darjeelings, almost anything from Nepal, Green Shan Lin Xi’s, and Greener Dong Dings. I’m in the process of trying Alishan’s. I also tend to really enjoy Yunnan Black or Red teas and white teas. I’m pickier with other teas like chamomile, green teas, and Masalas among several.

I used to give ratings, but now I only rate teas that have a strong impression on me. If I really like it, I’ll write it down.

I’ll enjoy a tea almost no matter what, even if the purpose is more medicinal, for it is my truest vice and addiction.

Location

Michigan, USA

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