91

Teapot time. 5g, 100mL, 195F, 10s rinse (drank) and 10 loosely timed steeps of 10/15/20/25/30/35/45s and 1/2/5m.

Unknown harvest, first ever Taiwanese tieguanyin. This was a very complex tea and I found it difficult to form an entire picture of its characteristics so in this note, I’m focusing on aromas and tastes.

Dry leaf smelled surprisingly fruity and cool given this was roasted. There were also hints of roasted peanut and dark green vegetal. Warmed leaf produced very strong aromas of roasted peanut, dark chocolate, orchid? and marine. Rinsing the leaf really opened up the profile. It was strongly pungent, something like tomato sauce, sweetened collards and roast strangely turning into plum, purple raisin, dark chocolate and a hint of pineapple. Again it changed, ending with dark-roast coffee, collards, brown sugar and more pronounced pineapple.

Because of the unfolding nature of the rinsed leaf scent, I continued to sniff the leaves every steep and found them to be consistently strong in aroma with evolutions of charcoal, wood, brown sugar, dark chocolate, pomegranate, stewed greens, roasted grains, roasted peanut, wet wheat and mango. The liquor also was very fragrant, mostly with notes of light fruitiness, chocolate, marshmallow, roasted peanut and brown sugar. It reminded me a lot of the Charcoal-Roasted Yushan aroma. The bottom of the cup smelled like brown sugar throughout. With all that said, obviously the fragrance of this tea is very engaging and a highlight for me.

Moving onto the liquor. It remained fairly consistent and strong in flavor in the first three steeps, starting with kind of an oyster-seawater-seaweed and banana leaf on the sip, turning into pine, vanilla, salt, brown sugar and peanut. The second steep saw the addition of an unripe mango aftertaste. The mouthfeel was interesting. I’ve read in numerous reviews about teas with a powdery mouthfeel and this was the first time I experienced such a texture. That and a moderate astringency lasted the entire session.

Banana leaf came in heavier on the third steep and turned into green banana, persisting until the end. I also noted a strong cooling sensation, especially felt in my ears. By the fourth steep, the marine notes faded and there were additions of molasses, coffee and minerals. As the session progressed, the prominent tastes moved around a bit, with butter and rice, unripe mango, roasted chestnut, grapefruit, bubblegum and a metallic tone. In the end, the liquor became very astringent and ended with a pronounced butter. Aftertastes ranged from strong banana leaf/green banana to fermented fruit and buttered green vegetables.

As I said before, this was a very complex tea. Even though it seems there was a weird assemblage of robust aromas and tastes, they all flowed together really well. It was strangely cool and warm, marine, fruity, starchy, vegetal, savory, and salty. All of this together made for a session that really captured my attention and focus. I’m glad this was my introduction to Taiwanese tieguanyin and I’m really looking forward to dipping into the few others I have in my collection.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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Bio

Always up for a trade – I keep an updated cupboard. Check it out. Don’t be shy. Message me if you want to try something :) I like to share, though I don’t keep large amounts of most teas on hand as I’m still in the midst of a years-long exploration phase. I feel that will be winding down later in 2019.

Preference reference:

100-90: Tea love. Will sell my belongings to acquire more. (Want this stocked if I have the space.)
89-80: Will sell somebody else’s belongings to acquire more. (Good enough to buy again.)
79-70: “We should get together and hangout some time.” Let’s cut the bullshit: You’re not worth my time. (Won’t buy more but might try a different harvest.)
69-60: This may be considered passing in education, but deep down you feel like a failure. (Def won’t buy again.)
59-0: Hellnaw!

Most enjoyment: Wuyi rock oolong, Laoshan green, red oolong, various Taiwanese high mountain oolong, citrus blossom scented oolong, some GABA oolong, non-sweet shou pu’er, resinous/fruity/meaty/bitter/herbal sheng pu’er. I also appreciate Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, Darjeeling and Nepali teas, bagged tea and tisanes. Big fan of medicinal flavors, citrus, thick mouthfeel, minerals and salivation. I take my teas without milks or sweeteners except sometimes chai and the rare London Fog or matcha latte. I generally steep a tea until it has no more to give.

I’ll try anything once because it helps me learn. Not opposed to well placed herbs, flowers, fruity bits and flavorings. Just nothing cloying especially banana, caramel, coconut, cinnamon or maple.

Currently working my way into a masters of environmental engineering program. My interests include bicycling, fungi, wetlands, falconry, conservation, creation, destruction, terraforming, spaceflight, the unknown and of course tea. Cook from scratch when I have the time. Reader for life.

Location

San Francisco, California, USA

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