75

Daily drinker that seems impossible to screw up. This tea is thick and so soft. It glides across the tongue smoothly. Sweet and round. Aromas and tastes of cocoa and vanilla (smells like powdered brownie mix), a slight brown toast sharpness, a soft undertone of black raspberry jam, and very light malt and wood, soft minerality. Tastes so much like a Taiwanese Assam, hm. It’s very twiggy — twiggy sweetness. Doesn’t seem very caffeinating.

After running through a 25g bag, I was never left with a strong impression. A rating of 75 seems appropriate for my likes but I can see some people really enjoying this tea.

Brewed western 3tsp to 8oz, water off boiling, 2-3 steeps. Last a good while gongfu, too.

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Brown Toast, Cocoa, Jam, Malt, Mineral, Nectar, Raspberry, Round , Smooth, Vanilla, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec 3 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML
eastkyteaguy

I’m just trying this tea now and was wondering if you had tried it gongfu. I’m three steeps in, and something truly strange is happening with this tea. The menthol and berry notes one would get out of a Taiwanese Yu Chi Assam or Wild Mountain Black are popping right now, and the aftertaste just keeps getting stronger. It’s like a big hit of fruit and mint on the front end followed by tons of malt, brown sugar, butter, vanilla, chocolate, roasted nuts, and sweet potato. It’s bizarre, but I can’t say it’s unpleasant. Did you ever get anything like that? Maybe it’s just the way I’m brewing it.

derk

I did have 2 gongfu sessions which were remarkably similar to western steepings.

The tea was cooling in general but I didn’t get any upfront menthol, nor berry.

Because of your comment, I opened my packet of What-Cha’s Yu Chi Assam yesterday for comparison. What you got out of that tea is waaay different than what I did.

If anything, this tea reminds me most of Whispering Pines Premium Taiwanese Assam but lacking oomph. I do look forward to your review :)

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eastkyteaguy

I’m just trying this tea now and was wondering if you had tried it gongfu. I’m three steeps in, and something truly strange is happening with this tea. The menthol and berry notes one would get out of a Taiwanese Yu Chi Assam or Wild Mountain Black are popping right now, and the aftertaste just keeps getting stronger. It’s like a big hit of fruit and mint on the front end followed by tons of malt, brown sugar, butter, vanilla, chocolate, roasted nuts, and sweet potato. It’s bizarre, but I can’t say it’s unpleasant. Did you ever get anything like that? Maybe it’s just the way I’m brewing it.

derk

I did have 2 gongfu sessions which were remarkably similar to western steepings.

The tea was cooling in general but I didn’t get any upfront menthol, nor berry.

Because of your comment, I opened my packet of What-Cha’s Yu Chi Assam yesterday for comparison. What you got out of that tea is waaay different than what I did.

If anything, this tea reminds me most of Whispering Pines Premium Taiwanese Assam but lacking oomph. I do look forward to your review :)

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Bio

Always up for a trade. I keep an updated cupboard. Check it out. Don’t be shy — message me if you want to try something! I send international :)

Most enjoyment:

Wuyi and Taiwanese oolong, GABA oolong, sheng and shou puerh, Yunnan and Wuyi blacks, Laoshan green. I also appreciate Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, Darjeeling and Nepali teas, bagged tea and herbal teas/tisanes.

I take my teas without milks or sweeteners except sometimes chai and the rare London Fog or matcha latte. I generally steep a tea until it has no more to give.

I’ll try anything once because it helps me learn. Not opposed to well placed herbs, flowers, fruity bits and flavorings. Just nothing cloying especially banana, caramel, coconut, cinnamon or maple. And no added sugars, sweeteners, candy or chocolate.

Preference reference:

100-90: A tea I can lose myself into. Something about it makes me slow down and appreciate not only the tea but all of life or a moment in time. If it’s a bagged or herbal tea, it’s of standout quality in comparison to similar items.
89-80: Fits my profile well enough to buy again. Some could be daily drinker teas.
79-70: Not a preferred tea. I might buy more or try a different harvest. Would gladly have a cup if offered.
69-60: Not necessarily a bad tea but one that I won’t buy again. Would have a cup if offered.
59-1: Lacking several elements, strangely clunky, possess off flavors/aroma/texture or something about it makes me not want to finish.
Unrated: Haven’t made up my mind or some other reason. If it’s puerh, I likely think it needs more age.

Location

Sonoma County, California, USA

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