78
drank Georgia MANNA Green Tea by What-Cha
1083 tasting notes

I’m excited to try a green tea from Georgia thanks to Martin!

Summer 2020 harvest, certified organic. The tea is soft and thick on the sip and transitions to a clean, mineral swallow before leaving a lingering salty and lightly drying finish. Notes of grass seed, green olive and the barest hint of spiced apricot are greeted by a mild astringency. Combined with the mineral-salty character, it creates an excellent palate cleanser and is treating me with a gentle hand upon waking.

While it’s a simple, mild tea, it excels at what it does. I’d say it easily plays a supporting role to the excellent black teas that What-Cha offers from Georgia.

Flavors: Apricot, Grass Seed, Mineral, Olives, Salty, Spices

Martin Bednář

Considering that Georgia produces mostly black teas… I think this is a nice surprise!

derk

Yeah, I’m interested in seeing how their green tea processing techniques might change over the years.

TeaEarleGreyHot

Is this tea from the Eastern European country of Georgia? Or is it one of the several State of Georgia, USA -grown teas?

Martin Bednář

It’s European country Georgia TeaEarleGreyHot and they do a great black tea. Check out Guria Likhauri from Dobra Cajovna I found out last year!

derk

The Guria Likhauri Martin shared with me is one of the best black teas I’ve had.

ashmanra

Oh yes, Martin’s suggestion of Guria Likhauri is quite a good one!

TeaEarleGreyHot

Thanks, everyone! Although I’m also interested in trying the US-grown teas from Alabama, Texas, Mississippi, Georgia, and elsewhere! I was impressed to read that some have imported varieties from Taiwan!

gmathis

I’ve tried a couple of varieties from the Charleston Tea Plantation. Their American Classic is pretty basic but an improvement over grocery store brand “just tea.”

TeaEarleGreyHot

Gmathis, that’s rather what I’d expect from a garden started by Lipton and today owned by Bigelow. They specialize in “just tea” from the grocery store (not that there’s anything wrong with that). But smaller operations may be more likely to incorporate other local ingredients as well to create truly unique tea. I’m thinking Georgia peaches, Texas citrus, southern nuts and berries. Herbs and spices and flavorings. And of course, reflecting the unique terroir and climate. They can also act as an accessible gateway other than mass merchants for others to begin exploring international and orthodox teas

gmathis

It’s been too long ago for me to remember clearly, but I think Charleston variety #2 was a classier upscale loose leaf … not seeing any offerings like that on their website now. But you’re right—a Yankee spin on domestic varieties would be great!

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Comments

Martin Bednář

Considering that Georgia produces mostly black teas… I think this is a nice surprise!

derk

Yeah, I’m interested in seeing how their green tea processing techniques might change over the years.

TeaEarleGreyHot

Is this tea from the Eastern European country of Georgia? Or is it one of the several State of Georgia, USA -grown teas?

Martin Bednář

It’s European country Georgia TeaEarleGreyHot and they do a great black tea. Check out Guria Likhauri from Dobra Cajovna I found out last year!

derk

The Guria Likhauri Martin shared with me is one of the best black teas I’ve had.

ashmanra

Oh yes, Martin’s suggestion of Guria Likhauri is quite a good one!

TeaEarleGreyHot

Thanks, everyone! Although I’m also interested in trying the US-grown teas from Alabama, Texas, Mississippi, Georgia, and elsewhere! I was impressed to read that some have imported varieties from Taiwan!

gmathis

I’ve tried a couple of varieties from the Charleston Tea Plantation. Their American Classic is pretty basic but an improvement over grocery store brand “just tea.”

TeaEarleGreyHot

Gmathis, that’s rather what I’d expect from a garden started by Lipton and today owned by Bigelow. They specialize in “just tea” from the grocery store (not that there’s anything wrong with that). But smaller operations may be more likely to incorporate other local ingredients as well to create truly unique tea. I’m thinking Georgia peaches, Texas citrus, southern nuts and berries. Herbs and spices and flavorings. And of course, reflecting the unique terroir and climate. They can also act as an accessible gateway other than mass merchants for others to begin exploring international and orthodox teas

gmathis

It’s been too long ago for me to remember clearly, but I think Charleston variety #2 was a classier upscale loose leaf … not seeing any offerings like that on their website now. But you’re right—a Yankee spin on domestic varieties would be great!

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Bio

Always open to gifting or swapping teas. I do send international when feasible. Please follow and send a message if you see a tea in my notes or cupboard that piques your interest.

Tea became a hobby and my daily drink of choice some time late in the last decade. My introduction to loose leaf came in the form of dumpster-dived Wuyi oolong packets that somebody left upon moving out of an apartment building. From there, my palate expanded to teas from across China and the world. I used to focus more on taste and still harbor the habit, but after trying sheng puer, I tend to focus more on how a tea feels in my body. Does it complement my constitution? Does it change my mood or does it enhance my current mindstate? Flavored teas are not a favorite but I do drink them intermittently.

In terms of who I am, you could consider me a jill of all trades. Specialty is not my strength, as can be seen in the spread of my tea notes. I might have attention issues. One thing I will always love is riding a bicycle.

Location

Sonoma County, California, USA

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