92

Here is another oldie, coming to you likely from either late May or early June. Quite frankly, I have stopped even roughly dating my sipdowns in my review notebooks, so all of my notes are out of order. I just seem to vaguely recall finishing what I had of this tea around that time. Clearly, organized is one thing I am not. Anyway, I found this to be a quality Tieguanyin, and actually, I enjoyed it more than the premium offering from the same producer.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 194 F water for 8 seconds. This infusion was chased by 18 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 10 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves produced aromas of lilac, gardenia, vanilla, orange blossom, baked bread, cream, and custard. After the rinse, I noted new aromas of butter, sweetgrass, honey, watercress, and coriander. The first infusion brought out aromas of violet, pastry, and orchid as well as somewhat more amplified sweetgrass, coriander, and watercress scents. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of sweetgrass, watercress, coriander, butter, cream, violet, baked bread, and pastry that were chased by pear, green apple, spinach, orange blossom, tangerine, honey, and sour apricot hints. The subsequent infusions introduced aromas of cinnamon, tangerine, sour apricot, and orange zest. Notes of cinnamon, orange zest, minerals, plum, lemon zest, sesame, white peach, and white grape appeared in the mouth alongside belatedly emerging custard, orchid, lilac, and gardenia notes and hints of vanilla and plum. I also noted more prevalent impressions of sour apricot, pear, green apple, spinach, and tangerine. As the tea faded, the liquor emphasized notes of minerals, pear, sweetgrass, coriander, butter, orange zest, white grape, green apple, cream, and watercress that were backed by subtler, thinner notes of spinach, tangerine, sour apricot, sesame, honey, baked bread, and violet.

This was a ridiculously flavorful, satisfying Tieguanyin. While I also enjoyed the premium Changkeng Tieguanyin that What-Cha offered, I found this one to be deeper, livelier, more memorable, and more textured overall. I would definitely be willing to recommend it to fans of jade Tieguanyin.

Flavors: Apricot, Baked Bread, Butter, Cinnamon, Citrus, Coriander, Cream, Custard, Floral, Gardenias, Grass, Green Apple, Honey, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest, Orchid, Pastries, Peach, Pear, Plums, Spinach, Vanilla, Vegetal, Violet, White Grapes

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
tea-sipper

All these particular flavor notes sound amazing!

tea-sipper

OH and it just turns out that I already have a sample from Kawaii around here… I must have it tomorrow.

eastkyteaguy

I’ll keep an eye out for your note as I’m curious to know what you’ll think. Jade TGY is like oolong comfort food to me in the sense that I often come back to it when I want a break from other types of tea.

eastkyteaguy

I’ll keep an eye out for your note as I’m curious to know what you’ll think. Jade TGY is like oolong comfort food to me in the sense that I often come back to it when I want a break from other types of tea.

tea-sipper

Yeah, Tie Guan Yin is definitely one of my ‘comfort food’ teas.

LuckyMe

I got bored of jade TGY a long time ago, but these flavor notes make me want to revisit it.

tea-sipper

Eastkyteaguy – my note will be embarrassing compared to your awesome note. I’m composing it now. haha

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Comments

tea-sipper

All these particular flavor notes sound amazing!

tea-sipper

OH and it just turns out that I already have a sample from Kawaii around here… I must have it tomorrow.

eastkyteaguy

I’ll keep an eye out for your note as I’m curious to know what you’ll think. Jade TGY is like oolong comfort food to me in the sense that I often come back to it when I want a break from other types of tea.

eastkyteaguy

I’ll keep an eye out for your note as I’m curious to know what you’ll think. Jade TGY is like oolong comfort food to me in the sense that I often come back to it when I want a break from other types of tea.

tea-sipper

Yeah, Tie Guan Yin is definitely one of my ‘comfort food’ teas.

LuckyMe

I got bored of jade TGY a long time ago, but these flavor notes make me want to revisit it.

tea-sipper

Eastkyteaguy – my note will be embarrassing compared to your awesome note. I’m composing it now. haha

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

My grading criteria for tea is as follows:

90-100: Exceptional. I love this stuff. If I can get it, I will drink it pretty much every day.

80-89: Very good. I really like this stuff and wouldn’t mind keeping it around for regular consumption.

70-79: Good. I like this stuff, but may or may not reach for it regularly.

60-69: Solid. I rather like this stuff and think it’s a little bit better-than-average. I’ll drink it with no complaints, but am more likely to reach for something I find more enjoyable than revisit it with regularity.

50-59: Average. I find this stuff to be more or less okay, but it is highly doubtful that I will revisit it in the near future if at all.

40-49: A little below average. I don’t really care for this tea and likely won’t have it again.

39 and lower: Varying degrees of yucky.

Don’t be surprised if my average scores are a bit on the high side because I tend to know what I like and what I dislike and will steer clear of teas I am likely to find unappealing.

Location

KY

Following These People

Moderator Tools

Mark as Spammer