drank 2018 F_D_T_ by White2Tea
495 tasting notes

Tea club sheng (10/18). 3/17/19 – 4-5 months rest
7.4g, 100 ml gaiwan, 212F
1 rinse
time: 9s/10/15/20/15/10/15…
Really young sheng. I didn’t get hit with too much bitterness until I pushed steep time up to 20s.
Flavors: green citrus, apricot (was the most prominent and enduring flavor), later steeps had a bitter edge, with a thicker soup, bittergreens, green.
I think it’ll be interesting to see how this one changes with time.
I need to figure out better storage than a shoebox in the living room.

Flavors: Apricot, Bitter, Citrus, Green, Thick

derk

I recently bought a big stoneware crock (after reading Cwyn’s blog) from the hardware store. Topped it with a terra cotta pot saucer big enough to fit the diameter. The fit of this lid isn’t perfect but that allows a little air exchange.
Hygrometer/thermometer inside. Pour a thin layer of distilled water on top which slowly seeps through the clay and keeps the humidity at a constant 65-70%. Just need to put the whole thing in a warmer part of the house.

hawkband1

Thanks! I need to try something. The low humidity during midwest winters isn’t doing my tea any favors.

derk

I spent about $65 on that 3-piece set up. 5-gal Ohio Stoneware crock, 12-in terra cotta saucer and a non-electronic meter. Chose it mainly for simplicity and functionality. Each piece can easily be repurposed if this method of storage doesn’t work to my liking or, glorb forbid, I stop drinking puerh and sell off my stash. Hope you find something that works for that dry winter air.

Mastress Alita

The air in Idaho is extremely dry; no humidity at all. I don’t really have the space to try to set up a pumidor, though.

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derk

I recently bought a big stoneware crock (after reading Cwyn’s blog) from the hardware store. Topped it with a terra cotta pot saucer big enough to fit the diameter. The fit of this lid isn’t perfect but that allows a little air exchange.
Hygrometer/thermometer inside. Pour a thin layer of distilled water on top which slowly seeps through the clay and keeps the humidity at a constant 65-70%. Just need to put the whole thing in a warmer part of the house.

hawkband1

Thanks! I need to try something. The low humidity during midwest winters isn’t doing my tea any favors.

derk

I spent about $65 on that 3-piece set up. 5-gal Ohio Stoneware crock, 12-in terra cotta saucer and a non-electronic meter. Chose it mainly for simplicity and functionality. Each piece can easily be repurposed if this method of storage doesn’t work to my liking or, glorb forbid, I stop drinking puerh and sell off my stash. Hope you find something that works for that dry winter air.

Mastress Alita

The air in Idaho is extremely dry; no humidity at all. I don’t really have the space to try to set up a pumidor, though.

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Bio

I started my tea journey with Stash/Celestial Seasonings tea bags years ago. All loose leaf, unless I’m sick or traveling.

I like black, oolong, white, herbals, and raw/ripe pu’erh. I don’t drink green tea often.

I play video games, read, and do pottery. My current favorite tea mug is one I threw and glazed.

I generally review teas twice – initial and final steeps.

My cupboard is mostly up to date.

Ratings
85-100 are teas that I loved and want to keep in stock.
71-84 are teas that are good. I may or may not get them again. Source for daily drinkers/work teas.
60-70 are teas that I didn’t like. I’ll finish what I bought.
Anything less than 60…nope.

Location

Iowa

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