68

I’m pretty interested in this one. Rosehips are something I’ve always liked, but haven’t experienced much as a tea ingredient. It seems like being paired with hibiscus wouldn’t be a bad idea. They’re both tart and fruity, after all. But I’m already wishing for a black tea base.

The dry bag smells like hibiscus and cherries. Maybe a bit like a sour apple, too. As it brews, the water changes to a bright red-orange. I tend to use a white or clear mug when I’m brewing a new tea so I can see it properly. Am I the only one that does that?

The tea’s scent as I sip reminds me of apples and oranges at the same time. It’s quite sour without sweetener, and even with a little, it remains that way. It’s also very fruity, and the hibiscus is for once not smothering the other ingredients. The rosehips remind me so much of dried apple slices. Or unspiced apple chips. Honestly, though, it’s not the boldest experience… it makes me want to see how other companies are doing this combination, or something similar.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 min, 0 sec

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Bio

Quiet, strange, and in love with the world of tea. Living just outside of Atlanta. Cat lover, electronic music geek, balcony gardener, and collector of fossils. On the hunt for the perfect tea in each of my favorite categories.

I have officially been here on Steepster for 10 years.

I prefer black teas, and my preferences change with the seasons. I drink my tea iced from April – October and hot during the few cold months.

You can assume that I’m preparing my tea using the Western method. I use stevia or honey as my sweetener. My tea cupboard always contains earl grey, chai, a sleepytime, a dessert, something fruity, an herbal, and a plain black.

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Decatur, GA

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https://instagram.com/soren_g...

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