Tuo Cha Green Pu Er Vintage 2005

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Butter, Cocoa, Coffee, Smoke, Toffee, White Chocolate
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by __Morgana__
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

0 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “This sample packet has two “nests” in it, each individually wrapped. Unwrapped, the leaves are light colored — they almost look like white tea leaves — and rather long. They’re tightly compressed....” Read full tasting note
    85

From American Tea Room

An organic compressed green pu er from China’s 1300 year old ancient tree forest. Multiple infusions a must to unlock its unique flavor and color.

About American Tea Room View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

85
1925 tasting notes

This sample packet has two “nests” in it, each individually wrapped.

Unwrapped, the leaves are light colored — they almost look like white tea leaves — and rather long. They’re tightly compressed. I rinsed and planned to let sit for 15 minutes before trying this yesterday, but then I ended up not getting to it. So the leaves sat overnight. I rinsed again this morning.

Then: gaiwan, boiling, 5/5/7/7/10/10/20/30/40/60

The liquor is a sort of golden apricot color in the early steeps. The flavor is mild. Not sweet exactly, but not bitter either.

I get the same general aromas and flavors that I get from other shengs — butter, white chocolate, cocoa, coffee, toffee — but also with a bit of smoke on this one.

The flavors are all quite smooth, which makes them seem a bit muted. But to me, that is an ok trade-off.

I am slowly but surely getting through my pu erh samples. It’s starting to seem like a bit of a chore now, here at the end, to get initial notes done on all of them.

On the flipside, I’m very much enjoying the result of having made it through my entire cupboard with initial tasting notes. Mostly this means I get to drink the tea and just enjoy it, without feeling the need to think about it enough to record a note. Sipdown notes are so much easier, since I only note the difference between my initial tasting note and the sipdown, if any.

In any case, I don’t know whether it’s that I don’t have a sophisticated enough palate, or whether I am not tasting the right teas, but I am finding that the shengs I taste all sort of taste the same. They mostly vary in whether there’s a smoky note or not, and in degrees of intensity of flavor.

I was expecting a much bigger difference in aroma and flavor from steep to steep than I typically get.

Which doesn’t mean I don’t like them. It just means it seems like a lot of trouble to go through multiple steeps for not very much ROI.

Flavors: Butter, Cocoa, Coffee, Smoke, Toffee, White Chocolate

Login or sign up to leave a comment.