Kunlu Mountain Pu-erh Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea
Flavors
Floral
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Dragoran
Average preparation
Boiling 7 g 4 oz / 125 ml

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  • “This tea is wonderful. You would be forgiven, if you were ducking in-and-out of a session that someone else was managing, for thinking this is an elegant, almost understated tea—all soft mouthfeel...” Read full tasting note
    93

From Bana Tea Company

Weight: 500 gram cake
Type: Raw Pu-erh (unfermented)
Grade: Premium
Production area: Kunlu Mountain, Simao Prefecture, Yunnan Province

Taste characteristics:
Kunlu Mountain,is a tea production area that sits along the Ancient Tea Horse Road, and that has been acclaimed as the “Imperial Tea Garden.” It is believed that the tribute tea for the imperial family during the Qing Dynasty was made from trees in this area. The tea is quite prominent in terms of quality; however, it is reported that the old trees of this area have been protected by the local villagers in recent years. As such, teas made from old trees in this area are extremely rare.

It is not surprising that the quality of this tea is superb. Steeped to an amber hue, the tea broth is clear and bright. The tea is so clean and crisp it is as if you are drinking spring water from the snow summit. At the same time, it is thick, full-bodied and leaves a comforting cooling sensation (“gan”) that fills the entire mouth. The flavor has an elegant honey note, which becomes more prominent in later steeping. Bana Tea Company is extremely proud to be able to source a tea of such high quality.

About Bana Tea Company View company

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1 Tasting Note

93
25 tasting notes

This tea is wonderful. You would be forgiven, if you were ducking in-and-out of a session that someone else was managing, for thinking this is an elegant, almost understated tea—all soft mouthfeel and gentle florals, with calm, uplifting qi and maybe a little bit of honey dancing around the edges of the flavor. However, its demure exterior belies a tea with some serious punchiness, which you might first notice in the long, lingering finish (again, characterized by the florals that dominate the nose and top taste). Push it just a little, especially in the early steeps, and you’ll find the mouthfeel turning viscous and slick, and the liquor picking up some of the almost soapy notes of, say, a 7542 of similar vintage. This potential for aggression translates into quite a bit of staying power, if you’re careful; I never manage to keep track of my infusion count, but I didn’t move on from flash infusions for the first four-to-five steeps or so.

I bought 50 g of this a couple of years ago; unfortunately, it seems to be sold out, now. If you can track some down, though, it’ll be worth your while.

EDIT: I steeped this overnight and came back to it late the next day. At this point, the tea tasted almost like pure honey, which was a very pleasant surprise given that I had only noted hints of honey during the main session.

Flavors: Floral

Preparation
Boiling 7 g 4 OZ / 125 ML

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