Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apple, Baked Bread, Berries, Floral, Honey, Red Fruits, Stewed Fruits, Tart, Vegetal
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Roswell Strange
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is part of my huge 2018 haul from Camellia Sinensis. All of you know my fondness for bug-bitten teas, and based on my rave review of their Bai Hao, I thought I’d like their Guei Fei as well. I...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “This is a queued tasting note. I had a weird/wonky Gong Fu session with this tea, which Camellia Sinensis added a generous free sample of into one of my orders this year. It wasn’t the tea itself...” Read full tasting note
    84

From Camellia Sinensis

Harvested in the vicinity of Ding Dong, the leaves of this wulong offer various colours from khaki to dark green, reflecting their moderate oxidation. The brew offers generous aromas of flowers and red fruits. The amber liquor is velvety and well balanced. Fine notes of spice bread (cinnamon) lead us to the soft sweet finish.

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6 Tasting Notes

85
223 tasting notes

This is part of my huge 2018 haul from Camellia Sinensis. All of you know my fondness for bug-bitten teas, and based on my rave review of their Bai Hao, I thought I’d like their Guei Fei as well. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot at 25, 20, 25, 30, 30, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds.

The dry aroma is of intense honey, flowers, and stewed fruit. The first steep has notes of honey, baked bread, flowers, sweet apple, and other stewed fruits. (Camellia Sinensis says “red fruits,” which I kind of agree with.) A tart berry note emerges in steep two. The tartness, stewed fruits, flowers, and, most of all, the honey characterize the next couple steeps. This is definitely a dessert tea. The honey and baked bread just keep getting stronger in the fifth and sixth rounds. Sadly, I don’t notice any cinnamon, which both Roswell Strange and the website point out. The flavours become slightly attenuated as the session ends, although the honey and red fruit are still present. The final steeps have a bit of astringency and are somewhat vegetal.

This is a sweet, luxurious Guei Fei that’s easy to drink. Though it lacks the complexity of the Bai Hao, this is kind of expected given the nature of this type of oolong. I’ve had a lot of bug-bitten oolongs recently and the flavours have become somewhat predictable, but this oolong executes them very well.

Flavors: Apple, Baked Bread, Berries, Floral, Honey, Red Fruits, Stewed Fruits, Tart, Vegetal

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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84
10112 tasting notes

This is a queued tasting note.

I had a weird/wonky Gong Fu session with this tea, which Camellia Sinensis added a generous free sample of into one of my orders this year.

It wasn’t the tea itself that was weird; just how I prepared it. I only had two infusions and then I just sort of, well to be perfectly honest, just forgot about the tea? I don’t even remember why: I was taking notes on the infusions and then I must have started cooking or watching TV or something else and the tea just sat there. But anyway, here are the notes I took for those two infusions:

- GORGEOUS leaf!!!
- Sweet, honey notes! Like ambrosia? Most dominate flavour
- Very light/gentle overall with a delicateness to it
- However, despite that the flavours are NOT subtle
- Also has notes of spring flowers, red fruits and white peach

After those delightful, wonderful Gong Fu infusions I popped the leaf into a mason jar and cold brewed the leaf (when I finally did remember I was drinking tea) so as to not waste it and get the most out of leaf which clearly wasn’t spent yet.

The cold brew was similar in flavour notes to what was observed in the Gong Fu infusions, just even sweeter and richer with more honey notes and more sweet fruity flavour. However, I also tasted a light finish that reminded me of Easter Buns a little bit? Kind of that sweet, doughy quality with a sort of cinnamon note as well? And of course a fruitier glaze but that easily melds with the honey and preexisting fruit notes.

I definitely look forward to further, more conscious exploration of this tea.

Lion

Love me some Gui Fei. I recently had my mind blown by one that exceeded all others I have tried.

Roswell Strange

Where from, if you don’t mind my asking?

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