2017 Winter Da Yu Ling High Mountain

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Flowers, Forest Floor, Orange Blossom, Orchid
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by LuckyMe
Average preparation
0 min, 45 sec 3 g 3 oz / 80 ml

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  • “While I love high mountain teas, I am fairly ambivalent towards Da Yu Lings. In my experience, they tend to be good but are seldom worth the high price they command. This one came highly...” Read full tasting note
    85

From Floating Leaves Tea

Da Yu Ling is the highest tea growing peak in Taiwan, this particular farm is about 2500 meters high. The tea this season is very delicate, complex and refined. We believe this may be because of the higher elevation, the weather being colder, and therefore the tea produced has more of the concentration and strength that winter tea is known for.

Once rinsed, the leaves reveal high notes of citrus and fruit, with a strong buttery scent in the base. The brewed tea, the broth, is very soft and very complex. Salivation is gentle and steady. The aftertaste is long lasting and really captivating. A clear bright grapefruit scent lingers long in the mouth and nose. By the third infusion the broth produces a fascinating texture, similar to the ‘popping’ feeling of pomelo (citrus) flesh.

As the tea passes the throat, you may feel the aftertaste lingers there, too. That is to say, the tea has “hou yun” (throat feeling). This is remarkable, especially for a fragrant high mountain oolong. It has complexity, structure and grace. We can’t recommend this tea highly enough for any serious high mountain oolong lover!

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1 Tasting Note

85
413 tasting notes

While I love high mountain teas, I am fairly ambivalent towards Da Yu Lings. In my experience, they tend to be good but are seldom worth the high price they command. This one came highly recommended by the vendor.

Out of the bag, the plump green leaves had a forest green aroma and some floral hints. There was also a bit of seaweed aroma, a not so good sign that the tea is beginning to lose freshnesss. The warmed gaiwan brought out osmanthus and orchid which changed to melon and tropical fruit after the rinse. The first infusion was thin and vegetal with a light floral sensation on the tongue in the finish. Second steep brought our more florals, but also the stale seaweed note. The third steep was the best one of all. A thick flower nectar with a prominent note of orange blossom and less of the seaweed. The fourth infusion was similarly floral but also brought some brothiness. The texture become softer and gives the tongue a gentle floral tingle as it goes down. In the next 5 steeps, the tea flattened out a bit as it settled into a pleasant floral/vegetal taste.

So much like past Da Yu Lings, this ended up being a good but unspectacular gao shan. Nice mouthfeel and texture, but lacking some depth. I would like to have seen some of the fruity aromas in the taste.

Flavors: Flowers, Forest Floor, Orange Blossom, Orchid

Preparation
0 min, 45 sec 3 g 3 OZ / 80 ML

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