One-Cup Teabag Gyokuro

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Bitter, Grapes, Grass, Metallic, Sweet, Vegetal
Sold in
Tea Bag
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Kirkoneill1988
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 30 sec 150 oz / 4436 ml

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From Ippodo

Being a shade-cultivated tea, gyokuro is rich in theanine- an amino acid responsible for gyokuro s full-bodied mellow sweetness and slightly viscous nature.
In Japan, there is a special name for this taste: umami.
Generally, the higher the grade, the richer the umami taste.

While many teas are served hot and consumed as a means to quench a thirst, gyokuro is different. A typical serving is a precious 1/3 of a teacup at a very comfortable 60 C. Indeed, gyokuro’ s refined luxurious taste is meant to besavored, not rushed.

Each of these convenient, easy-to-use teabags makes one cup of authentic gyokuro tea.
Packed with flavorful mecha (shoots and buds), these tetrahedral teabags release the aroma and flavor of the tea.
To draw out gyokuro’s rich umami taste, just let one teabag steep for about one and a half minutes in a cup of hot water—boiled water that has been allowed to cool slightly. Move the teabag around in the hot water until it has reached the desired strength, and you’re done. Take your time and draw out the full flavor of this delicious tea.

The small box, which includes instructions on the back in both English and Japanese, also makes for a handy travel companion.

About Ippodo View company

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1 Tasting Note

95
673 tasting notes

Guyokuro pyramid teabags by ippodo.

Grassy, grapes, vegetal, minerals, metallic (iron), bitter with a sweet aftertaste.

All in all, a yummy tea. I like the tastes in this tea. Somewhat similar yet different than sencha.

In the end after trying sencha, gyokuro, and hojicha; these teas are very yummy. There’s a taste unique to Japanese teas. I cannot put my finger on it. Unami? I do not know. Do you?
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Flavors: Bitter, Grapes, Grass, Metallic, Sweet, Vegetal

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 30 sec 150 OZ / 4436 ML
Togo

Gyokuro in a teabag? That doesn’t sound like the best idea :D

Kirkoneill1988

@togo: tbh, it was delicious! have you tried ippodo? it their sencha teabag and hojicha tea bag the tea water tastes when brewed just like their loose leaf. albeit a tad weaker

Togo

No I have never tried them. I am just concerned that one wouldn’t be able to extract the full potential of a tea such as gyokuro from a teabag, even though it still may be enjoyable.

Kirkoneill1988

@Togo: i’ve tried their loose leaf, it seems to go sour within 2 weeks. still drinkable but not as enjoyable. i was told by them to microwave some of the leaves before use if they go sour. seems silly…im trying their teabagged versions to see how long it takes to go sour. i do understand your point of view. i was told by a friend that japanese teas have to be all used up very quickly like ground coffee

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