IMMORTAL PRAYER OOLONG MINI-BRICK

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong
Flavors
Almond, Baked Bread, Dry Grass, Floral, Fruity, Garden Peas, Honey, Malt, Mineral, Narcissus, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Pine, Powdered sugar, Sweet, Sweet, warm grass, Toasted, Orchids
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Mtlhdtrix
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “A swap from Kawaii433. I think I still have few teas of yours mixed into my stash! My brick was 9 grams so I split it in half and brewed it in my porcelain pot. Like other zhangping shuixian...” Read full tasting note
    77
  • “Zhang Ping Shui Xian, grown on Wuyi mountain in Fujian but so different from the roasted Wuyi Rock Oolongs in that it’s not heavily oxidized or roasted. I think it’s one of the few, if not the...” Read full tasting note
    80

From Mandala Tea Company

From Fujian to you, this mini-brick oolong is a wonderful treat for you and your friends. Weighing in at 10 grams per brick, each vacuumed sealed pack gives you a lot to go on and may be easily split into smaller portions for smaller pots.

In China, this tea is called Zhang Ping Shui Xian and it is grown on Wuyi mountain in Fujian. It has a flowery aroma, reminiscent of Taiwanese high mountain oolong and a lovely, lively, sweet and thick flavor. Magnificent!

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2 Tasting Notes

77
481 tasting notes

A swap from Kawaii433. I think I still have few teas of yours mixed into my stash!

My brick was 9 grams so I split it in half and brewed it in my porcelain pot. Like other zhangping shuixian oolong, I opted for longer steeping times.

The dry leaves smell like I’ve buried my face in a narcissus bouquet studded with orchids. Lots of juicy green pear and a bit of malt. The warmed leaf was bright with honey, orange blossom and peas? The first steep brought out light toastiness in the wet leaf.

The first steep of 30 seconds at 190F left me thinking “Is this bad tea?” It had a nice orange blossom and sweetgrass aroma but there was an almost… you know that fresh mold smell? I could taste it. So I figured why not up the temperature and just roll with it — I see no mold in the other half of the brick. And maybe a higher temperature would thicken up the texture.

I went up to 205F with even longer steeping times and yeah, it was good. Orange blossom, dry grass, honey, lots of mineral tingling and salivation, slight baked bread. Honey aftertaste and a slight opening of the sinuses with something akin to spruce forest that had me breathing easily after a few more steeps. The body did become quite a bit thicker and a citrusy quality like mandarin zest presented. Bottom of the cup smell of honey and sweet almond. The aroma changed a bit into something soft like powdered sugar dusted flowers as the taste became even deeper with honey and ripe peach. A light gripping astringency in the throat was there early but otherwise the tea had no more else to show. Honey-sweet, floral, mineral, fruity and grassy with a medium-thick body.

Not going to rate it for now. I’ll try the remainder of the brick grandpa style with 205-212F water. I get the feeling this oolong might be well suited for that preparation.

[4.5g, 205F, 100mL porcelain pot, no rinse, longer gongfu steep times starting at 30s]

Book pairing: Intimacy: Trusting Oneself and the Other by Osho

Flavors: Almond, Baked Bread, Dry Grass, Floral, Fruity, Garden Peas, Honey, Malt, Mineral, Narcissus, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Pine, Powdered sugar, Sweet, Sweet, warm grass, Toasted

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80
312 tasting notes

Zhang Ping Shui Xian, grown on Wuyi mountain in Fujian but so different from the roasted Wuyi Rock Oolongs in that it’s not heavily oxidized or roasted. I think it’s one of the few, if not the only, oolong that is compressed into shapes. It’s in a 10-gram compressed square, vacuumed sealed, and each in its own package. The pretty dry brick smelled like bread and orchids. It was easy to break apart. I split mine in two. This time gongfu and next time grandpa style. The liquor is a bright orange gold-ish color and has a floral aroma with a strong floral taste, a little sweetness of honey. It has a clean mouthfeel, no slickness present but has a smooth texture.

I don’t particularly like too floral oolongs, but if you love floral oolongs, this one is for you. It’s very fresh, bright, refreshing. It begins as a mild and light taste but then progresses to a stronger floral & honey tea.

Yixing teapot, 195˚F, 110ml, 9 steeps: 5s rinse, 20s, 25s, 30s, 35s, 40s, 45s, 50s, 55s, 60s

Flavors: Baked Bread, Floral, Honey, Orchids

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 4 OZ / 110 ML
Cameron B.

I had to look these up, they’re so cute! And I’m definitely with you on the floral oolongs, not for me…

Kawaii433

Yes, they are very cute :D! Puerh comes in cute little shapes, I sure wish more oolong were compressed like this. ^^

Kawaii433

I thought the picture on Mandala’s site didn’t do the cuteness justice. Here is a picture of the little squares. https://www.instagram.com/p/BsUcnevn9UH/

derk

When we get around to a little swap, I’ll send you a Zhangping Shui Xian for more cuteness.

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