Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by ashmanra
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  • “Reviewing this tea, I am resolved to get my cupboard under control. (How many times have we all said that?) I was looking for something to share with hubby for breakfast, as he took the day off for...” Read full tasting note

From Oliver Pluff & Company

Notes: Oolong tea is processed to create tea with characteristics of both green and black tea, with an obvious sweet and nutty aroma. The tea is withered in the strong sun, before twisting, curling, and drying.

History: Oolong was discovered in the Wuyi province of China in the 16th century, and was often pressed into tea bricks or tea cakes. Americans in the 18th century purchased tea from this region in this form, which preserved it for travel. When tea cakes fell out of fashion and loose tea was preferred, the more modern form of oolong was produced.

Type: Loose Tea

Shelf Life: 24 Months

Packaged in Charleston, South Carolina

About Oliver Pluff & Company View company

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2 Tasting Notes

2634 tasting notes

Reviewing this tea, I am resolved to get my cupboard under control. (How many times have we all said that?)

I was looking for something to share with hubby for breakfast, as he took the day off for our anniversary but we ended up having to wait for the internet guy and I ended up teaching in the afternoon because of people who rescheduled due to Hurricane Michael. Hubby likes black tea with milk and sugar but he prefers to avoid sugar where he can since he is not giving up cookies AT ALL, so since he likes all other types of tea sans additions, we tend to drink everything BUT black tea together.

I made this oolong to go with our everything bagels and holy cow I see that I have had it for four years. That is too long, although the tea was fine and some oolongs age very well indeed. It is that old because I have entirely too much tea. Yes, I have given away tea, by the boxful, I have shared tea, I have invited people over and had tea flights and sent samples home with EVERYONE who will take some.

And yet even while I was horrified to see how old this is, and how much tea I had to dig through to find it, my main thought was…gee, I really need to order some more Da Hong Pao.

This tea was good, but it doesn’t hold a candle to a great DHP or TGY.

I think it is time to start working on that desert island list. My cupboard only lists tea that I bought large amounts of, and does not include small samples or swaps. So whatever you see in my cupboard, add about forty or fifty teas to that at the very least. I have a container of samples packed to send to my daughter at college so she and her buddies can root through it and try lots of different things, but there needs to be a huge overhaul of my entire system here.

One mistake I made was buying a large quantity of anything I liked a lot, usually because the more you buy, the more you save. Henceforth I think I will purchase much smaller amounts and enjoy them while they are at their freshest and best.

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