Six Borders Black

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Fair Trade, Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by Skysamurai
Average preparation
Not available

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  • “If you could choose between mass produced or family owned and operated which would you choose? This tea is wild grown and plucked by a single family. As I sit here and look at neatly rolled tea...” Read full tasting note
    93

From Rakkasan

While Vietnam is better known for its green tea, Six Borders Black is a surprisingly excellent wild black tea from the high mountain slopes of Yên Bái Province—a region that borders six other Vietnamese provinces. Grown above 4,300 feet and harvested by a single family of H’mong farmers, this tea is full of character and flavors of malt and chocolate. It has a rich copper liquor.

About Our Vietnamese Tea

Vietnamese tea trees are some of the oldest in the world. While tea farming in Vietnam has existed for hundreds of years, 20th century conflict badly harmed the industry and prevented it from reaching Western consumers. Only in the last generation has the political climate in Vietnam improved.

Our Vietnamese tea comes from wild trees growing in the pristine, ancient forests of the far northern provinces of Hà Giang and Yên Bái. The tea is grown on mountain sides at an altitude between 4,300 and 5,500 feet. Tended by families on small farms, each tea selection exudes superior character and is ethically and sustainably produced. Our wild Vietnamese teas are organically produced and comply with international standards.

About Rakkasan View company

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1 Tasting Note

93
640 tasting notes

If you could choose between mass produced or family owned and operated which would you choose? This tea is wild grown and plucked by a single family. As I sit here and look at neatly rolled tea leaves I can’t help but wonder what the family is like.

When I first opened the can I was hit with a sweet honey aroma. I’m not smelling it anymore but it’s on par with the honey like taste of the liquid. Along with the honey there are also some malt and slight chocolate notes. This is the type of black tea that you need to try without anything added first. While I do think it would hold up well to honey and milk or maybe some sugar I do think it’s best on it’s own.  Also if brewing in a tea pot you will need a bit more leaves then normal if you like a stronger brew as it is lighter on the black tea spectrum

Sil

sounds lovely

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