Iron Goddess

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Butter, Floral, Grass, Milk, Sweet
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Shanti Tea
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I’ve tried a few Tie Guan Yins before and this one is in my top 2 choices as far as leaf quality and taste. The aroma is fresh, sweet, and the leaves are truly whole – it only took one steep to...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “I now have whatever it is the BF has. Thanks, dude. I guess you missed that day in preschool when they taught everyone to cough into the crook of their elbow. (He really did cough right in my face!...” Read full tasting note
    84

From Shanti Tea

Tightly rolled, very aromatic high mountain oolong

Iron Goddess, aka Ti Kwan Yin, is a high-mountain oolong tea from Fujian Province, China. It has a subtle but distinctive flavor, a pale golden color, and a light floral fragrance. The tightly rolled leaves unfurl into large broad green leaves that can be steeped several times. Oolong teas can be an acquired taste if one is used to black teas with milk, however this one is well worth the time, and is very highly recommended.

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2 Tasting Notes

83
54 tasting notes

I’ve tried a few Tie Guan Yins before and this one is in my top 2 choices as far as leaf quality and taste. The aroma is fresh, sweet, and the leaves are truly whole – it only took one steep to see the original leaves come back to life. The oxidation of this organic variety is lighter than some, which might explain the fresh, bright quality I’m picking up from it. More green leaves than browner ones in Shanti’s version, it’s therefore perhaps not as “deep” of a flavor than some might be looking for, but I’ve prepared 28 ounces’ worth of good tea from the 2-cup measure of dry leave. Not too shabby.
If you’re not a fan of traditional senchas or chinese green teas, this oolong would be a good alternative as it retains many “green” vegetal qualities but with a sweetness the regular green teas don’t normally have Almost as if it’s been perfumed, but not as strong as a jasmine.

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84
1919 tasting notes

I now have whatever it is the BF has. Thanks, dude. I guess you missed that day in preschool when they taught everyone to cough into the crook of their elbow. (He really did cough right in my face! Nasty!)

So maybe I’m not tasting as well today as I should. I did manage to sleep pretty well — didn’t wake up to cough or anything. But if history teaches me anything its that coughs linger with me. I expect at some point I’ll have to put in a request for cough syrup with codeine. Ugh.

But in any case, this has a mild, grassy smell in the tin. Very different from yesterday’s goddess. No toast at all.

Gaiwain. 195F, rinse, 15 seconds, +5 through 4 steeps. I would have done more but I have an appointment this morning at 11 and I want to get through some other teas first.

The tea is a medium yellow and clear, and it smells a little milky, a little sweet, a little like flowers. It tastes just like it smells.

This is what I typically think of when I think if tieguanyins, and it’s a good representative of its type. Very drinkable, just not necessarily unique or transporting. It could get there with a bit more of a distinct floral aroma and smell. Maybe it will be different when I am not sick.

Flavors: Butter, Floral, Grass, Milk, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C
Lexie Aleah

Oh No! Hope you feel better soon! My family doesn’t cover their mouth when they cough either unfortunately…

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