Ceylon-Pettiagalla Estate

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Cream, Malt, Oats, Roasted Barley, Toast, Caramel, Chestnut, Floral, Leather, Molasses, Toffee, Walnut
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
Boiling 3 min, 15 sec 9 g 15 oz / 433 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I have been enjoying a number of Ceylon teas lately (this year is the 150-year anniversary of teas from Ceylon/Sri Lanka), so I thought I’d add some of my favorites to my notes on Steepster. I...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “This is an excellent tea with a light fruity taste and that brisk taste that I think is common to Ceylon teas. I think there is just a little bit of malt to this tea. This was a very good value as...” Read full tasting note
    77
  • “I’m starting to really get into Ceylonese black teas. It took forever, but I’m just now getting to a point where I feel like I’m beginning to appreciate them. Maybe the heat has me reaching for...” Read full tasting note
    83

From Simpson & Vail

Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon, has been providing excellent teas since the mid 1800’s and is currently one of the largest tea producing countries in the world. Prior to the introduction of tea plants to Sri Lanka, this country was primarily known for its crops of cinnamon and coffee. Due to economic changes, which affected the cinnamon crop, and a fungal disease, which devastated the coffee plants, Ceylon began experimenting with tea plants in 1839. It wasn’t until 1867, when James Taylor, a British planter, began a tea plantation in Kandy, that tea was established as a viable industry. His venture was soon followed by other tea gardens in and around the area.

Sri Lanka has 6 growing regions: Kandy, Uda Pussellawa, Uva, Ruhuna, Dimbula and Nuwara Eliya. The central highlands of Sri Lanka offer humidity, cooler temperatures and consistent rainfall, all of which provide a favorable environment for high quality teas.

Ceylon teas are best paired with foods such as breakfast meals (breads, eggs, smoked fish, bacon, etc.), light savory foods, meats, eggs, cream cheese, pastries and fruit, to name a few.

This tea comes from the Pettiagalla Estate, which is located in the town of Balangoda in the Ratnapura district, in the province of Sabaragamuwa. The estate tea bushes are located at altitudes ranging from 1670 to 3600 feet and the teas produced here are so consistent in high quality that Pettiagalla is considered one of the most prestigious tea gardens in Sri Lanka. The medium tightly curled leaves brew to an amber cup with a smooth, strong flavor that leaves the mouth feeling fresh and clean. This wonderful all-day tea can be drunk as is or with a slice of lemon to enhance the flavor.

Brew tea at 212º – steep for 3 minutes.

About Simpson & Vail View company

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3 Tasting Notes

75
81 tasting notes

I have been enjoying a number of Ceylon teas lately (this year is the 150-year anniversary of teas from Ceylon/Sri Lanka), so I thought I’d add some of my favorites to my notes on Steepster. I will start with this tea.

The dried leaves are broken and machine-rolled; very black and consistent. The color of the brewed liquor is similar to that of a brown ale beer.

I steeped 9 grams of dried tea in 20 ounces of near-boiling water for 4 minutes. I attempted multiple steepings of the same leaves, but this tea does not work for multiple steeps.

The initial aroma came across as malty—bread-like, even. The initial flavor I picked up was that of oatmeal or even cooked barley, with a hint of malt to it. There was also some creamy and bread/toast-like flavors as well.

Overall, it was a very typical black Ceylon tea, and is one of my favorite teas sold by Simpson & Vail. I have come to appreciate these types of black teas as ones that have enough caffeine to move me through the day but not so much that I am up for long hours after drinking them. I appreciate the fact that I can drink this on an empty stomach and not feel ill from the tannins (unlike a malty Assam tea). This has become one of my regular teas and, given the inexpensive cost for the loose leaf variety, it doesn’t “break the bank” to have it frequently.

An enjoyable tea.

Flavors: Cream, Malt, Oats, Roasted Barley, Toast

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 0 sec 9 g 20 OZ / 591 ML

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77
1758 tasting notes

This is an excellent tea with a light fruity taste and that brisk taste that I think is common to Ceylon teas. I think there is just a little bit of malt to this tea. This was a very good value as it was not expensive.

I steeped this tea one time in a 16oz Teavana Glass Perfect Tea Maker/Gravity Steeper with 3 tsp leaf and 200 degree water for 3 minutes.

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 3 tsp 16 OZ / 473 ML

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83
727 tasting notes

I’m starting to really get into Ceylonese black teas. It took forever, but I’m just now getting to a point where I feel like I’m beginning to appreciate them. Maybe the heat has me reaching for simple, yet flavorful black teas, or maybe I’m just starting to appreciate them for what they are. Anyway, this is the most recent Ceylonese tea I have tried. I meant to post this review yesterday, but I got sidetracked and ended up spending my evening listening to music.

I prepared this tea using my normal preparation for non-Chinese black teas. I steeped 1 teaspoon of loose tea leaves in 8 ounces of 212 F water for 3 minutes. I did not perform any additional infusions. I, however, did try a slightly longer infusion length of 4 minutes at one point. The results were not all that different from the initial preparation though, and I actually thought the shorter steep time was a little smoother. I will, therefore, be limiting my review to the initial preparation described above.

In the cup, the infused liquor showed a dark amber. I picked up aromas of caramel, toffee, cream, roasted nuts, molasses, and leather on the nose. In the mouth, I detected a smooth blend of cream, toffee, caramel, molasses, walnut, roasted chestnut, toast, and leather. I also thought I detected a fleeting floral sensation, but couldn’t be sure. The finish was rich and robust with lingering impressions of toast, molasses, caramel, roasted nuts, and leather. There was a slight astringency as well, though it did not particularly distract from the lingering taste sensations.

Honestly, when I think of a typical, unflavored black tea from Sri Lanka, I kind of think of a tea like this one. I might even say that if someone were to sit me down and ask me to describe what I feel to be a totally stereotypical Ceylon black tea, I would probably just point them toward this tea. That may seem like a knock, especially since I have made my ambivalence toward many Ceylon teas known in the past, but I do not really mean it that way. I just mean that the aroma and flavor profiles are representative of the Ceylonese black teas I have tried over the course of my life. Please understand that I’m not bragging, but if I were to have tried this tea in a blind tasting, I would have know that it was a Ceylon tea. To be perfectly frank, my complaints with Ceylon teas often revolve around astringency and lack of body, and well, I don’t really have those complaints with this tea. It is not too astringent, has a good body with a smooth texture in the mouth, and displays a pleasant, if not particularly complex mix of aromas and flavors. I like it. I wouldn’t call it a great tea, but I do think it is very good for what it is.

Flavors: Caramel, Chestnut, Cream, Floral, Leather, Molasses, Toast, Toffee, Walnut

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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