Bai Hao

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Floral, Sugarcane, Wet wood, Baked Bread, Cocoa, Dark Chocolate, Malt, Sour, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by nishnek
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 45 sec 7 g 6 oz / 168 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This was from one of their tasting pouches/sampler sets, 7g, it says, which I dumped all into my gaiwan and poured just off boiling water onto because I am an inebriated savage. Plus, I wasn’t all...” Read full tasting note

From Smacha

Made using long-proven production methods, Oriental Beauty has multi-colored, silver-tipped, twisted leaves that are heavily fermented and medium-roasted. Before picking in summer, the leaves are visited by small insects called leaf hoppers, which in large part produce the beautiful honey-sweetness of the tea. Only Organically controlled tea gardens can be used to keep the leaf hoppers alive.

About Smacha View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

106 tasting notes

This was from one of their tasting pouches/sampler sets, 7g, it says, which I dumped all into my gaiwan and poured just off boiling water onto because I am an inebriated savage. Plus, I wasn’t all that impressed with the autobrewed version of this tea, so I’m hoping this gives me more of a punch to be impressed with.

Such dappled colored leaves. A malty scent, whoo, is this really oolong?! Add the hot water and even more surprise, this smells a lot like a Chinese black to me, folks, malty and cocoa-y and yeasty, chewy, bready. Bit of a sugar cane sweet hint to the back of the smell, but man, that aroma and the darker orange liquid makes me distrust myself. Maybe I accidentally opened the wrong pouch.

Well, drink up, who cares. Yep, that tastes like a lighter black to me, wtf. Wonderfully chocolate-y and malty with a background of a sour wood taste, confusing. Sweet really only comes in the aftertaste after you stop drinking for a bit, wouldn’t call it an actual main flavor. There’s a fair amount of astringency and bitterness to the malt if you push it around kinda rough like, too, though, very squeaky clean mouthfeel.

Overall, luscious chocolate and bread and a lovely depth to it, but no idea why this tea is known for being sweet, I’ve definitely had sweeter all around. Maybe it’s just Smacha’s offering? Or maybe I’m butchering it with the really hot water, and long steeps, it does get much sweeter and more delicate as it cools in the cup for awhile and as I lighten up my intoxicated brewing times. There’s something about it that kind of reminds me more of English black tea in the overall character, though, so I could see why Queen Victoria supposedly liked it so much, especially as heavy steeped it has a bite and bitterness like black and I suspect she dumped milk and sugar in the thing. The brewed leaf is kinda ugly, very small pieces that look pretty chopped up, but just goes to show, can’t judge a book by the cover. Not something I think I’ll be coming back to, but it was interesting to try.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Cocoa, Dark Chocolate, Malt, Sour, Sugarcane, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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