Wu She Gao Feng High Mountain Light Roast Oolong Tea - Spring 2016

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Flowers, Sweet Potatoes, Burnt, Burnt Food, Roast nuts
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Low
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by the-comrade-in-autumn
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 10 g 5 oz / 150 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Lightly toasted, sweet, very pleasant aftertaste. I’m wondering if the leaves having a few months to rest has helped with some of the unpleasantness experienced by the previous reviewer. The smell...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “Leaves are boilerplate light roasted 高山: Some dark patches, but also a lot of greenleft. Steamed aroma of the leaves is not super pleasant. They smell, mostly, of slightly burnt food. Sesame, to...” Read full tasting note
    20

From Taiwan Sourcing

This high mountain oolong is from the highest part of Wu She area which is located at 1700 meters above sea level, and was picked and processed during the most perfect weather conditions, which proved tricky due to the Jeckyl and Hyde weather conditions that prevail in Wu She’s high mountain environment. The combination of human skills and nature’s fleeting benevolence makes this a beautiful and solid representation for winter high mountain oolong.

Roasted tea provides a special nuance and is especially enjoyable in the cold winter months. As such, we decided to have our Wu She roasted under the hand of a master. The masterful roasting did not only transform this tea into an almost “Dong Ding” like character, but further brought out the “winter rhythm” character we discussed in the jade oolong version. Not only it is surprisingly similar to a Competition Grade Dong Ding both in aroma and body, but also has more depth than one. If you are looking for a tea to warm you up in the year of 2016 no matter where you are in the globe, this Wu She Light Roast will certainly please you.

About Taiwan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

85
98 tasting notes

Lightly toasted, sweet, very pleasant aftertaste. I’m wondering if the leaves having a few months to rest has helped with some of the unpleasantness experienced by the previous reviewer. The smell of the steeped leaves do still smell a bit like burnt food… or at least I can see how that description came to mind, lol.

I’m not using a lot of leaf because while I brought a teapot with me I’m not at home so I’m having to opt for less leaf, longer steep and that probably has a big effect on taste.

Personally enjoying this first experience from Taiwan Sourcing. Sweet upfront with this slowly blossoming floral and sweet potato aftertaste. The other thing that really, really stands out from the very first sip is how creamy this tea is. Very smooth, thick mouth-feel.

Flavors: Flowers, Sweet Potatoes

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20
12 tasting notes

Leaves are boilerplate light roasted 高山: Some dark patches, but also a lot of greenleft. Steamed aroma of the leaves is not super pleasant. They smell, mostly, of slightly burnt food. Sesame, to be exact. The post first brew scent intensifies that burnt aroma. Yes, I truly do mean burnt, not toasted/roasted. Flavor is a mixed bag. The pleasant notes, mainly sweet potato, and (surprisingly) salt, are just overwhelmed by a burnt taste. Luckily, the burnt flavor isn’t as strong as it is in the nose. Even so, it’s unpleasant. I’m also getting a slight headache. Possibly due to the tea. I can’t be sure. The burnt taste dominates the finish. Eventually, it gives way to some sweetness. My throat feels chalky. Conversely, my mouth is slightly salivating. As the leaves continue to unfurl, it’s obvious that they’re still mostly green. My guess, is they roasted it at a high temperature, for a low amount of time. I don’t think this is a charcoal roast. It’s not mellow or thick enough.

I’m starting to feel slightly sick. That burnt note is just not playing well with my tastebuds. The front mouth taste sweetness (sweet potato) is definitely more pronounced. There’s also a sort of tiny metallic note coming in. It’s not unpleasant. It actually gives the tea a nice contrast to the much heavier burnt taste. Everytime I start to notice a new, or more pleasant, note, the burntness overwhelms it. It is such a bummer.

After the fifth brewing, the burnt aroma seems to finally be mellowing out. It’s still not very enjoyable, but at least it’s no longer aggressively unpleasant. Flavor keeps getting sweeter with every brew. The burnt taste is also way down. Finally, after six brews, we have a slightly decent cup of tea. That is harsh, but not entirely unfair. The tea had some good flavors, but that burnt taste/aroma/feel completely killed my enjoyment of this tea. It’s frustrating, since this is obviously good quality leaf, that was ruined in the processing. I have a theory on where the burntness comes from. The leaf contained a lot of near-fanning sized material. I think these were charred bits, left over from previous roastings. If this theory is correct, than that is not acceptable.

Flavors: Burnt, Burnt Food, Roast nuts

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 10 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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