Songboling Shui Xian Tea, Lot 266

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Coconut, Floral, Honey, Nutty, Sweet, Toasted, Char, Fig, Orchid, Roasted, Tobacco
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cameron B.
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 52 oz / 1529 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I bought a sample of this tea along with a little clay pot from Taiwan Tea Crafts. I’ve determined that this pot will be for darker oolongs, including wuyi and yancha. Still in the hunt for a clay...” Read full tasting note
    82
  • “Here is another unique tea from Taiwan Tea Crafts, a “Shui Xian” styled tea in processing, but made from local Taiwanese oolong cultivars. It’s a bit confusing to me why they chose to call this...” Read full tasting note
    55

From Taiwan Tea Crafts

Some might find it unusual to see a Shui Xian tea listed in our collection of Taiwanese teas. Shui Xian Oolong Tea, otherwise known as Fairies’ Tears or Water Sprite tea, is a very famous oolong originating from the Wuyi Mountains in the northern part of Fujian Province in mainland China. Our local variation is made in the same style with a Taiwanese twist, featuring local leaf varietals grown in our local terroir and showcasing the roasting talents of our own tea master. An amateur of original Wuyi Shui Xian will find our tea quite surprising in the way it respects the distinctive aromatic characteristics of true Wuyi Shui Xians. Made from carefully twisted JIn Xuan leaves, this tea is oxidized (medium level) to retain the characteristic orchid scent, then, skillfully roasted to reveal the characteristic smooth wild honey taste and smooth finish with distinctive mineral notes. No overbearing, raspy finish here (like it is the case with some cheap Chinese variations you can find on the market)! The roasting skills of our tea master, that spans from generations of knowledge, shines despite his great humility. We are proud to showcase his skills with this deserving contribution.

About Taiwan Tea Crafts View company

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2 Tasting Notes

82
486 tasting notes

I bought a sample of this tea along with a little clay pot from Taiwan Tea Crafts. I’ve determined that this pot will be for darker oolongs, including wuyi and yancha. Still in the hunt for a clay pot that pours quickly enough for young sheng. The dry leaf of this tea has an aroma of a dry autumn leaf pile – a note I often pick up from roasted teas. After a rinse, the leaf smelled roasty with a bit of a hint of coconut.

Rather awesomely, the first three steeps tasted quite a bit like toasted coconut. Maybe I was tasting the orchid note that Shui Xian is supposed to have, but I was just getting toasted coconut. I also picked up on a bit of a mineral taste and maybe some honey sweetness as well.

For the rest of the session, the coconut drops out, replaced by a floral note which makes me think that I may have just been tasting and interpreting an intense floral flavor as coconut – but that’s still what I got from it for sure. Flavors get a little bit lighter but remain balanced and sweet. The occasional nutty roasty note reminds me that this is a very well roasted tea – done with a lot of skill I’d say.

The first really good shui xian I’ve had and it’s from Taiwan! When I make another order from Taiwan Tea Crafts, I definitely might pick some of this up, as it’s a very fair price. I got in a bit of trouble for encouraging people to pick this up in teachat by claiming that it tastes like toasted coconut ;)

Flavors: Coconut, Floral, Honey, Nutty, Sweet, Toasted

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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55
306 tasting notes

Here is another unique tea from Taiwan Tea Crafts, a “Shui Xian” styled tea in processing, but made from local Taiwanese oolong cultivars. It’s a bit confusing to me why they chose to call this Shui Xian since the leaves are not long twisted oolong leaves like Wuyi Oolongs but are instead the tightly rolled balls you see in most Taiwanese oolong, along with many loose stems. I guess they’re just referring to it having the same general roasting process and treatment as Shui Xian up to the point where it is rolled.

The warm leaves in the gaiwan do in fact smell reminiscent of Shui Xian, a deep roasted scent with orchid notes. Because the leaves are rolled into beads, I am brewing this longer than I would if they were strip style oolong. After the first infusion, the leaves smell really strongly fruity and floral. Orchids and figs, maybe blackberries. Of course they smell very roasted as well.

Despite a mild yellow infusion, the flavor is very powerful. The deep roasted flavor has hints of char and tobacco and is underscored by a subtle orchid note. There isn’t much sweetness or fruitiness to the tea’s taste. Those more delicate notes present themselves more in the aroma. The tea is moderately drying in the throat and back of the tongue.

The second infusion is perhaps a bit more floral with a faint honey note. The roasted flavors are diminished, but the creeping dryness that sneaks up at the end of a sip is still there. This is definitely not a smooth tea, and I find that aspect of it very unfortunate because I am finding it hard to continue drinking because of how abrasive the texture is. Third infusion, lighter flavor but the dryness is still present.

I will have to give this tea a try another day and see if I still feel it is so drying.

Flavors: Char, Fig, Orchid, Roasted, Tobacco

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 45 sec 4 g 100 OZ / 2957 ML

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