Lishan Cui Luan High Mountain Spring Oolong Tea, Lot 619

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Custard, Flowers, Green Apple, Melon, Narcissus, Sour
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by LuckyMe
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 45 sec

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  • “It’s taken nearly a year, but I think my little purple clay teapot is finally starting to give back flavor. And that presents a real dilemma sometimes when it comes to rating teas. This was one...” Read full tasting note
    80

From Taiwan Tea Crafts

Lishan teas could very well be the best high mountain teas of Taiwan. The Lishan tea area sits majestically on the central ridge at altitudes ranging from 1500 m to 2400 m The average yearly temperature is below 20 degrees and frost can be experienced in the winter time. Tea grows at a slow pace therefore production is limited to only 2 to 3 crops a year. Owing to the particular climate and terroir, Lishan tea is rich in catechin which reduced the bitter and harsh elements in the liquor. The higher theanine and soluble nitrogen content contributes in heightening the compelling exotic sweetness of this tea. It is truly a unique tea coming from a uniquely rich soil and growing in the best natural conditions one can find. This Spring 2017 Lishan comes from an area Called Cui Luan along the Hehuan Shan range and from a garden that sits on a western facing slope. Tea from this garden have always offered a lot of amplitude in the range of tastes and depth in the luscious bouquet it proposes. It is quite simply all you can expect from a Taiwanese High Mountain but with an extra degree of intensity without any harshness. Despite this spring’s challenging weather, we are quite pleased with this selection that we would rate higher than last spring’s. It’s a must for all oolong enthusiast.

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1 Tasting Note

80
412 tasting notes

It’s taken nearly a year, but I think my little purple clay teapot is finally starting to give back flavor. And that presents a real dilemma sometimes when it comes to rating teas. This was one of those situations where the gaiwan and clay teapot resulted in two very different tasting teas.

The dry leaves are large and dark green with a green apple and orchid aroma. When wet, they emit fruity cucumber-melon and vegetal, slightly herbaceous aromas. The tea starts off fruity, some green apple sourness initially along with little floral hints in the background. This is where the gaiwan brewed tea stops and the other begins. In the tea brewed in clay, the depth of flavor is far greater. I detected notes of narcissus, hyacinth, egg custard, and pineapple in the finish. As it continues steeping, it gains thickness in the body and develops a sweet floral-fruity flavor. There’s a slight funk in the smell of the steeped leaves that thankfully doesn’t make it into the tea.

The main difference that I can tell between the porcelain and clay brewed teas seems to be the clay teapot did a good job of minimizing the sourness that cropped up here and there and amplified the flowery notes. The gaiwan brewed tea was a good, serviceable gao shan but nothing memorable and far from the better Li Shans I’ve had such as the recent one from What-Cha.

Flavors: Custard, Flowers, Green Apple, Melon, Narcissus, Sour

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 45 sec

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