DA HONG PAO OOLONG TEA - PREMIUM

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Char, Mineral, Raisins, Burnt, Honey, Molasses, Toast
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by TheTeaFairy
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec 4 g 3 oz / 90 ml

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From Tao Tea Leaf

Da Hong Pao is one of the most famous oolong teas in the world. It comes from the famous Wuyi mountains. It is one of 5 ‘Rock Teas’ meaning the teas are grown in more rocky areas making the mineral content in the soil much denser. This is what gives the 5 rock teas their signature flavours. What makes Da Hong Pao special is its darker, heavier and more oxidized flavor. This very full bodied tea has a very particular sweetness to it and is reminiscent of baked goods or molasses.

Region: Wuyi Mountains, Fujian Province, China.

Other Names: Big Red Robe, Ta Hong Pao.

Steeping Guide:

Teaware: YiXing Teapot or Ceramic Gaiwan

Amount: 3g /1½ teaspoons

Temperature: 100°c (212°F)

Steeping Time: We suggest that you rinse your tea leaves before enjoying them, simply add water to the leaves and discard. This wakes them up and they are ready to go. For your first steep, we suggest a 30-50 second steep. For the second steep 10 seconds is best, simply add 5 seconds to each of your next steeps. This will allow you to experience the full range of tastes the leaves have to offer.

*These steeping directions are for a traditional Gong Fu style tea, if you are brewing this tea in a regular cup we recommend steeping for 2 – 3 minutes. This tea can be steeped 5 times.

About Tao Tea Leaf View company

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4 Tasting Notes

85
1757 tasting notes

Mmmmm yes this was good today. Fruity and mineral rich. Four steeps of complex roasted yum! Not much variation between steeps, besides getting smoother over time. This would be great for grandpa style brewing, I suspect.

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987 tasting notes

Sipdown from this morning – I originally wrote about this tea here: http://booksandtea.ca/2015/12/toronto-tea-festival-tasting-set/

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80
503 tasting notes

This was a very interesting tea session. I feel that I may have gotten perhaps old tea. I do not state this because it was a bad tea session, it just wasn’t as good as I thought it should be. I purchased a small sample size just to try out this “Award Winner” before I purchase a larger quantity. I would have loved to use this in my yixing, but I was shorted a few grams which was sad.
The long black leaves are a deep black and crimson. I placed these in my small gaiwan and prepared brewing. The immediate scent was of charcoal, raisins, and hot stones. I poured out and was very excited to taste. The initial sip was heavy with minerals and char. This brew had a deep body to start, but this body died away rather quickly. Once I reached only the third steeping it had already flattened out and became subtle. I was a little disappointed with this considering its price. It was a nice Wuyi, but I don’t believe it to be prize winning. I’ve had basic DHP that have stood up longer than this. Altogether, I don’t think I’ll be restocking this particular tea.

https://instagram.com/p/0-XP-CzGei/?taken-by=haveteawilltravel

Flavors: Char, Mineral, Raisins

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 90 ML
boychik

I’m sorry it didn’t work out for you. What’s your parameters ? I do 6g for 100ml. I always rinse too

Haveteawilltravel

I usually use those same parameters, except, for some reason my sample was short so I was only able to use 4.5g for 90ml

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95
360 tasting notes

This is a rock tea from the Wuyi Mountains. Expect greatness from a good quality Da Hong Pao.

And this one is nothing short of greatness.

It’s expensive but totally worth it. I was very lucky to have gotten it during Tao Tea Leaf 50% off sale. Bought 150g cause I knew an award winning Big Red Robe could only mean good news. Now I wish I had bought double!

Using 5g in small yixing clay pot.

The leaf is as dark as night.

The brew has this lovely orangey amber colour.

The scent is very fragrant. The taste is like burnt toasts with honey and molasses. Thick mouthfeel, full bodied. Very rich and tasty.

Someone very knowledgable with rock tea pointed out that I should find bitterness in a good Da Hong Pao.

I don’t get bitterness at all, but I realized that what he referred to as “bitter” is probably the burnt and charred taste I get, my own interpretation of it anyways.

You can actually taste the minerals, it’s even a little salty.

It’s a beautiful tea, worth devoting time to.

I like it so much, I will use it to season a very small 70ml yixing pot I just got.

Pic of the session:

http://instagram.com/p/r8qANlwh2g/

Flavors: Burnt, Char, Honey, Mineral, Molasses, Toast

Ubacat

Mmmmm sounds great. I’m adding this to my wish list.

KiwiDelight

Is that the Eco-Cha yixing? Sounds like it’s already having fun :]

Cheri

I love mineral and slightly salty in a tea. <3

boychik

I was so stupid to get only 25g of this tea :(
But hey I never tried it
I think I like Bei Do even more;)

boychik

Love the set up as usual!

TheTeaFairy

Ubacat, it is totally worth having!

Kiwidelight, it is the eco-cha! I will keep it for darker oolong such as Dancong, but my mini-me pot will by for rock tea :-)

TheTeaFairy

Boychik, don’t feel stupid…we say we want ALL the tea but we can’t really do that you know? Lol, at least you got some…and how much of the Bei Dou did you get? See, now I was stupid, cause I got none of it!!!

boychik

Same. 25g. I’ll save some for you to try;)

TheTeaFairy

Thank boychik <3

Hi shutao :-)

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