Pinglin Ai Jiao Aboriginal Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Astringent, Bitter, Cantaloupe, Floral, Fruity, Melon, Mineral, Peach, Sour, Spicy, Sugar
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 30 sec 6 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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  • “The description of this tea mentions that the cultivar originates from Fujian. The dry leaf smell, however, reminds me of Dan Cong oolongs, but it’s even more fruity. There are notes of watermelon,...” Read full tasting note
    84

From Tea Mountain

Harvest: May 2018
Cultivar: Ai Jiao
District: Pinglin

To be honest – this is one of the best taiwanese oolong I’ve ever tasted. It comes from small and semi-wild garden in Pinglin, and – what is most interesting – it is made from old cultivar Ai Jiao which is famous in Wuyishan. The unusual and fullbodied taste comes from the harvest period and natural farming. Cause the farmer do not uses any pesticides, the jassids can bite the tea leaves what creates interesting flowery tastes and aromas you can find in Bai Hao Oolong or Gui Fei Oolong.

This gentle roasted and medium oxidized tea delivers wide pallete of flavours! Dry leaves smells fresh, grassy and flowery (a little bit like high-end grade of fresh olive oil). When you infuse Ai Jiao, you find also lots of spring honey, raspberries with hints of sandal wood or cinnamon.

About Tea Mountain View company

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1 Tasting Note

84
346 tasting notes

The description of this tea mentions that the cultivar originates from Fujian. The dry leaf smell, however, reminds me of Dan Cong oolongs, but it’s even more fruity. There are notes of watermelon, peach and other fruits. After the leaves open up, the aroma changes to a more floral, grassy and spicy one. I also get some curious notes of stir fried beef and shrimps.

I found the taste to be very hard to describe. I don’t think I’ve ever had Ai Jiao yancha, but the taste profile does bear resemblance to a fruitier version of some rock oolongs. It has strong minerality and floral components. I brewed it quite strong today, which meant a less balanced profile, but the evolution of the various tastes and textures is pronounced this way and very unique. At first sip, the bitterness hits, followed by an astringency spreading all over my mouth and a tingling sourness at the back. After swallowing, I get a warming sensation spreading through my body and a fragrant, floral aftertaste that slowly gives way to a rock sugar and cantaloupe sweetness. At first, the cha qi seems to be more of a bodily experience, but over time I notice heightened sensations as well.

All in all, this is a tea that I think has to be experienced, there is nothing like it in my past drinking experiences to be honest.

Song pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwcaDvr8f1o

Flavors: Astringent, Bitter, Cantaloupe, Floral, Fruity, Melon, Mineral, Peach, Sour, Spicy, Sugar

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 30 sec 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
Leafhopper

This sounds fascinating! Based on a translated version of their site, Tea Mountain has a lot of unusual teas from Pinglin. I might have to give them a try once I get through the several dozen other vendors in my queue. :)

derk

Great song, tea added to wishlist

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