Dong Ding (Tung Ting) Oolong Tea

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Oolong Tea
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From Tea Side

Dong Ding (Tung Ting) Style Thai Oolong Tea #AA.

Growing Region: Chiang Rai province, northern Thailand, 1400 metres. Hand-picked high mountain oolong tea.

Appearance: Heavy roasted, medium fermented, hemisphere-shaped oolong tea.

Ding Dong is a special processing method of Chin Shin Oolong (TTES #17) variety. This variety of tea has been imported to Taiwan from Fujian province of China in the mid-19th century. Then in Taiwan, on Dong Ding Mountain the special way of cooking has been discovered and Dong Ding Oolong has appeared.

This Dong Ding will appeal to those who like tea of strong fire. Personally, I do not really like heavy roasted oolongs, but at the time I could not resist. It has a taste and an unusual flavor and depth. My German colleague finds similarities of this tea with thoroughbred Wuyi Shan oolongs. And although I would probably refrained from such a comparison, nonetheless.

Taste and Aroma: The tea smells deliciously fruity, floral and bready. And in its taste fruity-floral tones also compete with smack of fried bread crust. This struggle goes on all the seven steepings – this oolong, of course, can hold more, but the taste of bread and flowers so satiates, that no more is required.

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1 Tasting Note

921 tasting notes

Ah spring, I love you so, the windows are open and the trees are blooming, the air is full of pollen. And I can’t breathe. This allergy season is off to a wonderful asthma filled start, yay. The real annoying thing is my inhaler has always made me super jittery and just unbelievably derpy, so much derp in my brain. I no longer have a brain I have a head full of pollen! But, so far my sense of smell and taste has not been screwed so I still have lots of tea to enjoy while sniffing the flowers. Joy!

Today I am looking at a tea from Thailand tea company Tea Side, their Dong Ding (Tung Ting) Oolong Tea #AA. This tea comes from the high mountain region of Chang Rai Province and is the Chin Shin varietal (TTES #17) which was imported from Taiwan which in turn was originally imported from China. So this tea is said to be for those who are fan of heavy roasts, and we all know that I am all about those roasty teas! Sniffing time and the aroma of the leaves is definitely roasted with notes of barley, toasted walnuts, bamboo, honey, and an underlying and very distant honeysuckles. It has a strong char note that is very woody reminding me of bamboo coal, though it is also very sweet, and I like the blending of sweet and roast.

The brewed leaves have notes of char and barley, a little bit of burnt barley along with gently toasted. There is also a touch of narcissus and honeysuckle and a hint of sweetness that is fairly faint. The liquid of the first steep is gentle, sweet notes of honey and barley with walnut shells and a touch of baking bread and mineral, it is pleasantly sweet and toasty.

The first steep is light in both mouthfeel and taste, it has a slight smoothness and mineral slipperiness that has the promise of future thickness. The taste starts off with a gentle mineral and light sweet barley note with underlying freshly toasted bread. Then the taste retains its bread notes and adds a bit of honey giving me a real great toast taste. The finish has a distinct distant squash blossom note that lingers.

Onward to the next steep, the aroma is sweet and char with burnt barley and a slight hint of smokiness with the char notes. This steep manages to be both drier and smoother, with a surprising cooling finish. The taste is sweet, smokey, and fairly rich. Strong notes of barley, toast, and char with undertones of bamboo and smoke. This steep has no sweetness, it is all about the char and grainy notes which have a little bit of a pleasant nutty bitterness to it.

This steep is both light in taste and aroma, with the same barley and toast notes of the previous steeps, but also with an undertone of plums. It starts with mineral and juicy plum with an undertone of honey smothered toast made from very grain heavy bread. The finish is walnut shells and a touch of mineral with a lingering sweetness. My only complaint with this tea is it lacked staying power, it was really potent and then pitters out pretty early, and didn’t really last past steep five.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2016/03/tea-side-dong-ding-tung-ting-oolong-tea.html

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