2018 Bitter Leaf Raw Pu-erh Tea

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Absinthe, Apricot, Bitter, Burnt Food, Butter, Cardamom, Citrusy, Floral, Flowers, Green Apple, Herbaceous, Herbs, Honey, Hot Hay, Medicinal, Metallic, Nutty, Oats, Parsley, Sugar, Sweet, Tobacco, Vegetal, Wood
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 oz / 120 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

0 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “I tend to like bitter sheng and this one is no exception. There is substantial complexity, although the profile is not exactly my favourite. It has a full body and an active syrupy mouthfeel that’s...” Read full tasting note
    82

From Tea Side

Origin: Thailand
Harvest: 2018
Elevation: 1300 m

Raw pu-erh tea made from thai bitter leaf tea tree material.

This sheng does not resemble Bulang, nor Lao Man Er, nor other Chinese regions. But that is how I describe the organoleptic properties… The bitterness is so edible, soft. Without citrus notes – closer to the fragrant fresh wormwood. Now, if we add more sweet wildflowers and a drop of vanilla to this fragrant bitterness, then we get this sheng.

Many puerh producers seek to collect the harvest from sweet trees. And we, of course, understand them in this – everyone loves sweet tea, it is easy to sell, etc. But we are convinced that bitter-leaf pu-erh is seriously undervalued for two main reasons:

It has a powerful fragrant Huygan. That is not just a returning sweetness but a very fragrant sweet aftertaste.
It has a very potent relaxing and sedative Qi effect.
By the way, bitterness is good for our body. It stimulates the work of the overall endocrine and digestive system.

For these two huge advantages, Huygan and healing ability of Qi, we are ready to forgive this tea a lot – both bitterness and not very expressive foreground taste. Thus we decided to make a special cake with this bitter leaf.

About Tea Side View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

82
670 tasting notes

I tend to like bitter sheng and this one is no exception. There is substantial complexity, although the profile is not exactly my favourite. It has a full body and an active syrupy mouthfeel that’s not overly heavy. Also, the tea has a relaxing, almost sedating effect on the mind and a clear chest warming quality.

The dry leaf aroma is fresh, but not too green anymore. There are hints of apple as well as honey. After the rinse, I get a sense of hot hay, apricots, oats, and black cardamom. In terms of pungency it’s about average for sheng of this age.

The rinse itself tastes of seeds and vegetable oils with a citrusy finish. First steep is mostly sweet at first, but the bitterness gradually intensifies and peaks in the aftertaste in fact. It is a little metallic and flowery, while the next one is more herbaceous. Third infusion is now quite bitter. It is a herbaceous (wormwood) and slightly medicinal kind of bitterness. Subsequently, I also detected various flavours of parsnips, sugar, tobacco, fish skin, nuts, burnt butter, and mild woody ones towards the end.

As for the aftertaste, once the bitterness fades a bit, one can experience notes ranging from white wine (riesling), orange zest and vanilla all the way to sunflower seeds and black pepper.

Flavors: Absinthe, Apricot, Bitter, Burnt Food, Butter, Cardamom, Citrusy, Floral, Flowers, Green Apple, Herbaceous, Herbs, Honey, Hot Hay, Medicinal, Metallic, Nutty, Oats, Parsley, Sugar, Sweet, Tobacco, Vegetal, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.