Quangzhou Milk Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Butter, Cake, Cream, Floral, Strawberry, Sweet, Apricot, Frosting, Gardenias, Grass, Honeydew, Honeysuckle, Jasmine, Nectar, Osmanthus, Peach, Straw, Vanilla, Corn Husk, Milk, Popcorn
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 2 min, 15 sec 6 g 9 oz / 256 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “My goodness, I’m in love with this tea! I like it so much I don’t want to share with anyone;) So yes, when you open the sealed packet there is a strong strawberry aroma. It is sweet, and creamy,...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “Milk oolongs are tricky things. When speaking of milk oolong in the traditional sense, one is usually referring to Jin Xuan, or Golden Lily, a tea cultivar that naturally provides a milky, buttery...” Read full tasting note
    11
  • “Mmm, I just remembered that Tealux is now called Tealyra, so I am reposting under Tealyra even though it is essentially the same thing. Also, strangely I’ve noticed that Guangzhou on Steepster...” Read full tasting note
    95

From Tealyra

From the Wuyi Mountains of China comes this limited edition oolong, traditional milk oolongs come from Taiwan and tend to have a milder milk flavour. This Chinese produced oolong packs an indulgent almost buttery creaminess along with the silky milky flavour. Quangzhou Milk Oolong is almost entirely produced by hand. The tea is withered and while they are still moist, they are steamed for a short amount of time in a milk water combination. This tea being scented with pure milk only add to its depth of rich flavour.

About Tealyra View company

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3 Tasting Notes

95
42 tasting notes

My goodness, I’m in love with this tea! I like it so much I don’t want to share with anyone;)
So yes, when you open the sealed packet there is a strong strawberry aroma. It is sweet, and creamy, full of buttery goodness. It smells like strawberry frosting or cake, but with floral notes. It is Rich and Delicious. I find the cream and berry to compliment each other, and while being strong they give the tea an interesting character. I also have to say that I do not like flavored teas, and that this one is different, its not your perfumed Teavana mix. Its more delicate, more tasteful and classy. Steeped, its much more mellow, it looses the overpowering aroma yet retains the notes of cream, berries, buttercream, honeysuckle, gardenia. The taste is fresh and not overly complicated. It leaves a bit of a mineral tingling, and a mouthwatering feel. Most likely because I’m now craving Strawberry Cake lol ;)
It is definitely a “desert” brew, but if you like rich, aromatic and vivid experience I would definitely recommend this one.

Flavors: Butter, Cake, Cream, Floral, Strawberry, Sweet

Preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 2 min, 0 sec 3 tsp 10 OZ / 295 ML

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11
882 tasting notes

Milk oolongs are tricky things. When speaking of milk oolong in the traditional sense, one is usually referring to Jin Xuan, or Golden Lily, a tea cultivar that naturally provides a milky, buttery aroma and flavor. Unfortunately, Jin Xuan is not the only milk oolong on the market. You see, it seems that nowadays almost every tea merchant is offering one or more versions of milk oolong, indicating that this tea is very popular with the buying public, and the high demand for quality milk oolongs often greatly exceeds supply. In response, tea producers have developed ingenious ways of meeting the demand for milk oolong-steam oolong tea leaves in a milk water combination or spray oolong tea leaves in an artifical milk flavoring. This tea is not an all-natural milk oolong. It is a Chinese oolong that has been steamed in a combination of milk and water in order to approximate the aroma and flavor of authentic Jin Xuan.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. As usual, I rinsed the leaves and conducted a 10 second initial infusion. I then increased the steep time by 2 seconds for each subsequent infusion. In this session, I conducted a total of 13 infusions (10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34 seconds). Again, I used 6 grams of loose tea leaves in my 4 ounce gaiwan, as I normally do for my review sessions. The water temperature was set at 195 F.

Prior to infusion, I began questioning my decision to buy this tea. I knew it was flavored from the get go, but when I opened the sealed pouch, a heavy aroma of cream assaulted my nose. There was something else there too, almost like strawberry flavoring, but I wasn’t quite sure. After the rinse, the aroma was tamed considerably. I detected much milder scents of cream, butter, straw, sweetgrass, gardenias, jasmine, honeysuckle, vanilla, and osmanthus. I could still detect a fruity, almost strawberry-like scent lurking underneath the layers of cream, butter, grass, and flowers. The first infusion yielded a similar, but somewhat milder aroma. In the mouth, I picked up heavy flavors of gardenia, honeysuckle, osmanthus, jasmine, vanilla, cake frosting, butter, cream, straw, sweetgrass, honeydew, peach, nectarine, apricot, and nectar. Yep, I also got a heaping helping of strawberry as well. The second and third infusions continued down this road, but were somewhat milder. With each subsequent infusion, the floral and most of the fruity aromas and flavors faded, leaving me with turbulent, and to me, increasingly synthetic vanilla, cream, butter, and strawberry aromas and flavors underscoring traces of nectar, straw, and sweetgrass.

Well, this was disappointing. I am generally a fan of Tealyra and have had good luck with their oolongs in the past (I’m a big fan of their Wenshan Baozhong Reserve, Tieguanyin Deep Roasted, and Jade Oolong), but I found this to be borderline nauseating. It only got worse for me the longer I spent with it. I have not had a ton of milk oolongs, but I have been a bit spoiled, as I started with some really good authentic Jin Xuans. As a result, I’m at a point where I can kind of tell when something is artificially flavored, even if the vendor chooses not to disclose this information. Now, to give credit where credit is due, Tealyra does indicate to potential buyers that this is a flavored oolong rather than a traditional Jin Xuan. I respect them for that. I fear, however, that there may be a little more going on with this tea than is indicated. To be blunt, I have a sneaking suspicion that this may be a little more than an oolong that has been steamed in a combination of milk and water. I just cannot shake that ridiculous strawberry presence. It could be a byproduct of the flavoring for all I know, but I remain more than a touch skeptical. Whatever the case may be, I do not think that this is a good oolong. There are good flavored oolongs out there, and some of them may even be artificially flavored for all I know, but I just do not think that this is one of them. Getting past that odd, over-the-top strawberry presence that I so greatly disliked, there wasn’t much depth here. The layering of aromas and flavors was rough and turbulent, and more than that, it never calmed. I’ll give this tea a little credit. My experience with it indicated that it has staying power in a longer session. Unfortunately, I just did not find that it smelled or tasted all that good.

Flavors: Apricot, Butter, Cream, Floral, Frosting, Gardenias, Grass, Honeydew, Honeysuckle, Jasmine, Nectar, Osmanthus, Peach, Straw, Strawberry, Vanilla

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Evol Ving Ness

Is this the most recent batch or a previous one? I purchased four different milk oolongs from Tealyra this past March and this is the one that I liked best. So much so that it is on my rebuy list. No strawberry flavour came up for me.

eastkyteaguy

This is from the most recent batch. Like you, I also purchased four different milk oolongs from Tealyra, but this was the one I liked least. Could be different strokes and all, or it could have been a mistake. I know Tealyra produces a strawberry oolong, so I’m kind of hoping that there was a mistake in packing or something. That may be wishful thinking, however, as at least one reviewer on Tealyra’s site described the same strawberry flavor.

eastkyteaguy

I should also note that this is by far the worst tea I have had from Tealyra. I tend to be a big fan of their products-I really think they offer a solid range of teas with perhaps more than their fair share of stunners (especially in the oolong department, though I have had good black, green, white, and pu-erh teas from them as well). I wish they got a little more attention here on Steepster.

Evol Ving Ness

Hmm, curiouser and curiouser.

Evol Ving Ness

I agree. I have been very pleased with almost all of my purchases from Tealyra. The customer service, however, could use some work.

eastkyteaguy

Yeah, I have to agree. I haven’t had too much trouble with them, but their shipping times can be slow. I also wish they were a little clearer about harvest dates for each of their teas, as well as points of origin. I’m a suckered for little details like that, and those sorts of little touches would make them seem more transparent,and accessible. Also, their product descriptions are terribly written. I have been told that I can be something of a grammar nazi and a stickler for plain, unadorned composition, so the way they present their products irks me. I still continue to buy from them regularly though, and I’m often impressed with their offerings.

eastkyteaguy

Ugghh, I just caught two typos in my response. I hate typing on my phone. Sorry.

Evol Ving Ness

:)

I noticed a typo in my comment on your other posting. At least we know.

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95
1088 tasting notes

Mmm, I just remembered that Tealux is now called Tealyra, so I am reposting under Tealyra even though it is essentially the same thing. Also, strangely I’ve noticed that Guangzhou on Steepster is predominantly spelled with a Q as the first letter. When I was working there, it most definitely was transliterated into English with G as the first letter, so I am going with that spelling.

I had been feeling a bit better and stronger, but things are dipping again. Yesterday, I attended a qi gong class, which should fill me with vibrancy and something positive, but no. Instead, I woke up feeling exhausted and weak. Chronic illness sucks.

I did have a fantastic breakfast though. Leftover Horiatiki salad from Greek Town and some grilled squid I picked up in Korean town. Bizarre but good. I love living in a city where it’s all available in a day’s outing.

Followed breakfast up with this lovely lovely tea.

Perhaps this is a new batch of limited edition Milk Oolong compared to that of previous reviews. The label doesn’t indicate limited edition, but there don’t seem to be other options.

My first steeping was milky cream with the barest hint of vegetal. The second steep, which I left a wee bit too long, is coming through with a very pleasant oolong green, but not too green, flavour with a bit of creamy backup. No sense of mineral or imitation flavours. I look forward what the next steeps bring.

Third steeping, still buttery with a strong enough light oolong backup. Most likely will pleasantly survive a fourth and maybe fifth steeping.

Yep, the fourth and fifth steepings were quite lovely and flavourful, so I could have kept going if I hadn’t gotten bored.

Flavors: Butter, Corn Husk, Cream, Milk, Popcorn

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 30 sec 1 tsp 12 OZ / 354 ML
Indigobloom

Omg great food combo! :P
Also, I need to buy some Milky Oolong soon!! yum

Plunkybug

Milk oolong is definitely one of my favourite oolongs.

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