Qianjiazhai 2014 Loose Gong Ting Shu

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Clay, Dark Wood, Forest Floor, Leather, Mineral, Mushrooms, Sand, Wet Earth, Wet Rocks, Fish Broth, Fishy, Seaweed, Cocoa, Creamy, Graham Cracker, Pastries, Roasted Barley, Vanilla
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Jim Marks
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 6 oz / 164 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Aroma: Fish, vanilla Color: Deep Grapefruit First steep: Barley Second steep: My tongue was too hot to be receptive Third steep: color so dark red it’s almost purple, mushroom” Read full tasting note
    81
  • “Tea drunk alert. I was not expecting or waiting for that, I noticed as I was drinking I started to furiously make a list copying down all of Steepster’s suggested flavors in the drop-down menu, the...” Read full tasting note
    93
  • “At first I thought that the language was a little flowery for this shou’s writeup, but the more steeps I get through, the more I notice that it does taste a bit like pastry and barley. It starts...” Read full tasting note
    89
  • “I cannot argue with the write-up, this is a sweet shu. It is also, at least in the early steepings, very subtle and soft. It is early morning and so my mouth may not be 100% awake yet, but I don’t...” Read full tasting note

From Verdant Tea

Master Zhou is not just a farmer — he also teaches middle school students in the nearby town of Zhenyuan. Being an active member of the cooperative is his commitment to the protecting present day state of the region, but teaching is part of his commitment to give the younger generation a reason to stay in the countryside and carry on the work of protecting Qianjiazhai’s old growth tea forest for generations to come.

This shu pu’er comes from the family of one of Master Zhou’s students. Gong Ting originally referred to a set of standards for tribute tea, which was part of the old tax system. It is often literally translated to ‘palace grade tea’. Gong Ting pu’er is usually picked earlier in the spring and made from smaller buds. This makes the flavors sweeter and richer than other shu pu’er.

About Verdant Tea View company

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4 Tasting Notes

81
8 tasting notes

Aroma: Fish, vanilla
Color: Deep Grapefruit
First steep: Barley
Second steep: My tongue was too hot to be receptive
Third steep: color so dark red it’s almost purple, mushroom

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93
18 tasting notes

Tea drunk alert. I was not expecting or waiting for that, I noticed as I was drinking I started to furiously make a list copying down all of Steepster’s suggested flavors in the drop-down menu, the tea gave me a real buzz, and suddenly I found myself laughing for no apparent reason, giddy, and I think it should be called “tea high” instead of “drunk.” This happened into the third steep, so with 5 grams I had consumed 225 ml in less than 10 minutes, and after that third steep I had to wait almost a half an hour before doing round four.

The aroma of the leaves after two rinses was wonderful: yes, pastry dough or biscuit, an earthiness and accents of vanilla, cocoa, maybe sweet almond, some kind of spice. Taste: my first impression was wow lovely creamy texture with a sweetness and also a burnt edge—in a dark roast kind of way, not unpleasant, like swirling ocean contained by a rocky cliff. As I continued to steep, the creaminess and biscuit aroma persisted as a main trait, the dark roast edge eventually rounded off into the eighth cup, maybe some caramel appeared early on, and graham cracker?? in second steep. Overall, very savory, lovely creamy, 5 grams went past 10 steeps, and got me tea drunk. This is my first tea from Verdant, I bought two samples, and Verdant sent me a free sample as well, thank you!

Update: A second session, that burnt dark roast edge again very present, and because this is loose tea, I can’t steep this fast enough. The first few steeps are flashes—as soon as I pour the water on I am scrambling to pour it off because it steeps so quickly. I think next session I will try steeping with a lower water temp, maybe 200 degrees and see if that takes of that very dark roast almost burnt edge. No tea drunkeness this time, but a nice warming buzz with no jitters.

By the way, Verdant’s Qianjiazhai shu “nuggets” (in another review of mine) does not have that harsh edge even at the start, and I suspect that is due to the nuggets having less surface area and taking several steeps to really open up. Love that tea.

Flavors: Cocoa, Creamy, Graham Cracker, Pastries, Roasted Barley, Vanilla

Preparation
5 g 3 OZ / 75 ML

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89
239 tasting notes

At first I thought that the language was a little flowery for this shou’s writeup, but the more steeps I get through, the more I notice that it does taste a bit like pastry and barley.

It starts out dark and woody, with hints of chocolate. As it steeps out, it has a nice, savory breadiness to it. It’s very cozy and warming.

I never did get the vanilla and other things they described in their writeup, but regardless, this tea was a nice way to start the morning.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec
Daylon R Thomas

Verdant’s write ups are weird anyway lol

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368 tasting notes

I cannot argue with the write-up, this is a sweet shu. It is also, at least in the early steepings, very subtle and soft. It is early morning and so my mouth may not be 100% awake yet, but I don’t think that’s out and out blunting anything that is going on here.

The steeps are rich and dark, the mouth feel is thick and actually a bit drying/astringent which is very unusual for a sweet shu (in my experience).

Some very interesting herbal and spice notes are coming out in the fourth steep.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 15 g 11 OZ / 330 ML

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