Taiwan "Shui Xian" Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Baked Bread, Char, Cinnamon, Cream, Herbaceous, Honey, Mineral, Pine, Raisins, Sugar, Roasted
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
5 g 3 oz / 89 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

3 Own it Own it

3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Alright, I’m finally back. Not only have I been swamped at work for the last week, but I have had very limited internet access at home, so posting reviews ended up falling by the wayside for me. I...” Read full tasting note
    87
  • “Interesting tea. It has a complex and strong scent to it, but the taste itself is somewhat bland to me. I can’t quite articulate what the scent is, except that I’ve smelled it before…I almost want...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “This tea has a velvety texture and hits with an immediate burst of charcoal, spicy and ever so slightly sweet, and the smooth roasted aftertaste has a unique peat smokiness to it. Highly suggestive...” Read full tasting note

From What-Cha

It has the sweet honey and mineral notes expected of a Shui Xian with a non-dominant roasted taste in the background.

A Taiwanese take on Wuyi’s Shui Xian to meet local demand, produced using the local Si Ji Chun cultivar rather than the Shui Xian cultivar, it possesses many of the characteristics expected of a Shui Xian but with a smoother texture thanks to the Taiwanese cultivar.

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

87
779 tasting notes

Alright, I’m finally back. Not only have I been swamped at work for the last week, but I have had very limited internet access at home, so posting reviews ended up falling by the wayside for me. I finally managed to regain consistent internet access this morning, so now I am taking a break to get some stuff posted here. My lack of activity would not allow anyone to know it, but I have been on a huge Shui Xian kick for the last little bit and have taken to comparing teas from different terroirs. This tea went head to head with an old bush Zhengyan Shui Xian, and surprisingly enough, it came out the winner in my eyes.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was followed by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, and 7 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry leaves emitted aromas of char, pine, honey, and raisin underscored by a hint of cinnamon. After the rinse, I noted the emergence of stronger char and pine aromas as well as a hint of baked bread. The first infusion then introduced a hint of rock sugar to the nose. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered up notes of char, pine, honey, raisin, cinnamon, and rock sugar backed by hints of baked bread. Subsequent infusions saw the nose turn creamier and a bit spicier. New notes of minerals, cream, spruce, and juniper showed up in the mouth. The final infusions offered notes of minerals, char, and pine that quickly gave way to subtler notes of cream, raisin, and rock sugar.

At first, I did not know what to make of this tea. I am very used to Wuyi Shui Xian, so this seemed very soft and subtle in comparison. Taking my time with each infusion, however, yielded tremendous rewards. Once I adjusted to the tea’s softer, smoother, simpler character, I found an easy-drinking tea with admirable longevity and great texture in the mouth. Should What-Cha ever restock this tea, I will most definitely be buying more. It made for a great break from the heavier traditional Wuyi Shui Xian oolongs to which I am so accustomed.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Char, Cinnamon, Cream, Herbaceous, Honey, Mineral, Pine, Raisins, Sugar

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
What-Cha

Glad you enjoyed it, sadly the batches from my supplier were very inconsistent with some very heavy in twigs, so I’ve had to reluctantly drop the tea from the main lineup but I’ll bring it back occasionally as a mystery tea.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

75
46 tasting notes

Interesting tea. It has a complex and strong scent to it, but the taste itself is somewhat bland to me. I can’t quite articulate what the scent is, except that I’ve smelled it before…I almost want to say mineral chocolate without there actually being any chocolate smell. Would that maybe be malt instead? It’s not earthy, it’s not nutty, it’s “not” many things…

I don’t know. It’s not a terrible tea, I just struggle in explaining what it IS, instead of what it ISN’T.

You know…I think the scent is similar to a cinnamon-tasting tea I had, except there’s not really a cinnamon taste to the tea. It’s has a similarity to the scent of a cinnamony tea I had, minus the cinnamon. But I suppose that’s another round of saying what this tea isn’t, instead of what it IS.

This’ll be my new puzzle as I try to figure it out in future steeps. I’m pretty sure it’s just because I haven’t had enough organoleptic training…

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

62 tasting notes

This tea has a velvety texture and hits with an immediate burst of charcoal, spicy and ever so slightly sweet, and the smooth roasted aftertaste has a unique peat smokiness to it. Highly suggestive of houjicha, but with more depth of flavor. Wonderful.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.