Taiwan Four Seasons Light-Roasted Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Butter, Cookie, Cream, Floral, Grass, Honeysuckle, Orchid, Roasted, Spinach, Sugarcane, Vegetal, Walnut
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 oz / 120 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

2 Want it Want it

3 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I received this as a mystery tea in my last What-Cha order and honestly wasn’t expecting much. Even though the description said it was “lightly roasted,” I’ve learned from experience that this can...” Read full tasting note
    77
  • “I already liked the Four Seasons What-Cha usually has, but the roast mellows out the more soapy florals and adds a little bit of sweetness to it. It’s a very soft, floral, creamy, and almost...” Read full tasting note

From What-Cha

A splendid oolong which has a sweet taste thanks to it’s light roast which combines very well with a fantastic floral taste due to the Four Seasons cultivar.

Four Seasons is the cultivar which thrives best in Ming Jian and produces a smooth oolong with an incredible floral aroma and taste at a very affordable price, making it a great candidate for a daily drinker.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Floral aroma and taste

Harvest: Spring, April 2019

Origin: Ming Jian, Nantou County, Taiwan
Altitude: 350m
Farmer: Mr. Yi
Sourced: Specialist tea ‘finisher’ who buys, processes and roasts the tea leaves of local farmers

Cultivar: Si Ji Chun (Four Seaons)
Oxidisation: 10-15%
Roast: Light (Level 2)
Picking: Machine

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 90°C/194°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 3-4 minutes

Packaging: Non-resealable vacuum-sealed bag packaged in Taiwan

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

77
175 tasting notes

I received this as a mystery tea in my last What-Cha order and honestly wasn’t expecting much. Even though the description said it was “lightly roasted,” I’ve learned from experience that this can mean different things to different people. However, What-Cha was telling the truth and this tea is a nice balance between the roast and heady florals. I steeped 6 g of tea in a 120 ml teapot at 195F for 20, 15, 20, 25, 30, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds.

The dry aroma is of sugar cookies, honeysuckle, orchids, and other flowers. Yeah, this tastes like a floral sugar cookie: honeysuckle, orchid, butter, light roast, and kind of a sugarcane sweetness, with a bit of grass. The second steep has notes of cream and lilac and a drying mouthfeel. After the second steep, the wet leaves in the teapot have a wonderfully heady lilac aroma, which sadly never appears as strongly in the cup. The floral and grassy flavours become even more prominent in the third steep.

From the fourth steep onward, the roast starts taking over, though there’s still some florals. I get walnuts, roast, grass, honeysuckle, spinach, and veggies in the last few steeps.

Even though it peaked early, this tea was a pleasant surprise, and I’m about halfway through my 50 g bag. I definitely recommend it as a daily drinker.

Flavors: Butter, Cookie, Cream, Floral, Grass, Honeysuckle, Orchid, Roasted, Spinach, Sugarcane, Vegetal, Walnut

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
eastkyteaguy

This is a tea that I’m hoping to break out soon. I’ve been skewing hard towards Chinese teas for months now and have not spent much time with a Taiwanese tea in about four months.

Leafhopper

I quite enjoyed it, although it did peak early. I’m sure you’ll be able to come up with a much better tasting note!

eastkyteaguy

I don’t know about that. I find roasted Four Seasons oolongs to be hit or miss. I know Daylon was big on this one, and he and I seem to have very similar taste in oolongs, so I guess we’ll see.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

1124 tasting notes
I already liked the Four Seasons What-Cha usually has, but the roast mellows out the more soapy florals and adds a little bit of sweetness to it. It’s a very soft, floral, creamy, and almost dessert like tea that pairs well with white chocolate….and its very refreshing. I need to make more details for this one, but I needed to put this one up. I like it more than some of my other high mountain oolongs, which is saying something. More notes in the future.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.