Dahongpao Blend (Big Red Robe) 大红袍

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by BigDaddy
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 5 oz / 160 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “A classic fruity Da Hong Pao with some nice complexity. Nose; very strong fruit, lychee, raspberry, tulse, toasted nori, plumeria, citrus, ginger, galangal, slight herbal note. Palate; plum, blood...” Read full tasting note
    93
  • “When I tried it last six months ago, it was lighter and more floral, a soprano Wuyi: predominantly high notes. Now, a lower register is developing, with floral just a suggestion rather than...” Read full tasting note
  • “Ah, Da Hong Pao, the big daddy of all cliff tea. This being a blend will certainly not taste like anything I’ve had before, and the mystery continues. Deep, sultry, but not overly forceful as some...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Wuyi Origin

Blending Dahongpao (all the material are from 2015)
Baking level: Up-Medium (baked 4 times)
Feature: A tea good in the energy, strong essence, and balanced in aroma and soup.
For blending this Dahongpao (DHP), in Wuyi we also call it commerical dahongapo, we can choose the material to do the blending according to our clients requests. Of course blending is the complementary and integration of different varieties of tea, it is not just simply a mixture. It is not easy to find the same taste of dahongpao from different factories, this is the exact charm of dahongpao.

About Wuyi Origin View company

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3 Tasting Notes

93
91 tasting notes

A classic fruity Da Hong Pao with some nice complexity.
Nose; very strong fruit, lychee, raspberry, tulse, toasted nori, plumeria, citrus, ginger, galangal, slight herbal note.
Palate; plum, blood orange, redwood, limestone, strawberry, galangal, a bit dry, limestone.

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40 tasting notes

When I tried it last six months ago, it was lighter and more floral, a soprano Wuyi: predominantly high notes. Now, a lower register is developing, with floral just a suggestion rather than dominating the conversation.

Warm, embracing, roasted grains and mineral, there is still a bit of lightness, a lilt at the end of the sip that I have not had in a Da Hong Pao before. It’s almost a drawing up of my soft palate in response to the tea as I end my swallow.

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88
188 tasting notes

Ah, Da Hong Pao, the big daddy of all cliff tea. This being a blend will certainly not taste like anything I’ve had before, and the mystery continues. Deep, sultry, but not overly forceful as some I’ve tried. A faint sweetness in the back of the throat and some red stone fruit flavors too. Baked 4 times which for me is on the lower side, but they must’ve been watching this like hawks because the amount of roast in the mouth feels like 6-8. Leaf structure held up nicely after 10 steeps, the minerality hits just perfectly at steep 4 along the lateral tongue. A blend for all seasons, cause I love me some DHP.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 5 OZ / 160 ML
Zennenn

Just read this after I also posted a review! It’s interesting that you and I both noticed less punch, but I wouldn’t say this is weak in flavor or complexity, and it seems you found the same. I thought it was an unusual tea.

BigDaddy

I do agree, lighter. Yet that seems to be the trend these days for the Western market at least. I’m not sure that is the case here or just the way they make this blend. #tanluwils a fellow Steepster has been in correspondence with the company maybe he can shed some light on the matter.

Zennenn

I’ll have to reach out, thanks!

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