Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Bitter, Burnt Food, Fish Broth, Flowers, Forest Floor, Fruity, Honey, Meat, Metallic, Milk, Mineral, Oats, Peach, Pine, Raisins, Roasted, Spices, Stonefruit, Vegetables, Wood, Burnt Sugar, Char, Drying, Orange Blossom, Sweet
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 oz / 75 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Gongfu Sipdown (1709)! Thank you Togo for this sample! The aroma coming off the leaves after the initial couple steeps was heavy charcoal and roast with a herbaceous pungency that really reminded...” Read full tasting note
  • “Like derk, I found this tea imbalanced in the past, with the roast muting its character. However, today it seems much more lively and pleasant. I suppose this evolution could be compared to some...” Read full tasting note
    78
  • “This dancong oolong seems to have been pretty heavily roasted and is still hanging on to that character. Beyond the roastiness is a dark honeyed taste with grilled yellow nectarine secondary note...” Read full tasting note
    59

From Wuyi Origin

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3 Tasting Notes

13978 tasting notes

Gongfu Sipdown (1709)!

Thank you Togo for this sample!

The aroma coming off the leaves after the initial couple steeps was heavy charcoal and roast with a herbaceous pungency that really reminded me of dill. However, the steeped tea itself has a lot more of a mouthwatering juicy floral quality that really stands out among the other tasting notes. Very, very lychee forward. Of course, it’s still pretty roasted with a lot of those charcoal, woody, and heavily roasted chicory root type notes – but it’s just much more dynamic and nuanced overall, and with no dill! Though I love a nice, roasty oolong I have to admit that notes of chicory are not something I usually enjoy because they’re usually coupled with a sharp top note sourness, but I only got that in one or two steeps of this tea session and the lovely sweetness of the lychee more than made up for it!

Tea Photos: https://www.instagram.com/p/CfEeJoTOMXQ/

Song Pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWmJbtJsx_w

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78
858 tasting notes

Like derk, I found this tea imbalanced in the past, with the roast muting its character. However, today it seems much more lively and pleasant. I suppose this evolution could be compared to some lighter roasted Wuyi oolongs. It is still a heavy tea though – in its taste profile, cha qi and also the texture.

The dry leaf scent is fruity with a strong peach note to it, while the wet leaves smell of forest floor, vegetables and some flowers. It is a much less sweet aroma after the rinse.

Taste is now quite well-balanced with a strong woody, spicy, and bitter character. There are notes of fish meat, burnt food, crickets as well as some metallic ones. The woody bitterness persists into the aftertaste, which reminds me of a conifer forest at first. Over time, a sweetness develops that moves the profile more towards honey, milk and raisins. Eventually, pronounced stone fruit flavours come back from the grave too. It is a very long aftertaste that remains interesting for more than 30 minutes after drinking the tea.

The liquor has a medium body, but feels very heavy in the mouth. It has a drying, slightly foamy, oat milk like texture. Topping off the experience is a sort of dizzying and sedating cha qi that is somewhat psychedelic.

Flavors: Bitter, Burnt Food, Fish Broth, Flowers, Forest Floor, Fruity, Honey, Meat, Metallic, Milk, Mineral, Oats, Peach, Pine, Raisins, Roasted, Spices, Stonefruit, Vegetables, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 2 OZ / 50 ML

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59
1337 tasting notes

This dancong oolong seems to have been pretty heavily roasted and is still hanging on to that character. Beyond the roastiness is a dark honeyed taste with grilled yellow nectarine secondary note weaving in and out, burnt sugar, hints of orange blossom, metallic, alkaline. Dark honey aftertaste. Texture never caught me, maybe on the thin side.

This tea is much heavier both in taste and the way it sits in my stomach than the Song Zhong I had recently. The Chi Ye also has a deeper bitterness and the astringency comes in early. The bitterness is its own entity, not integrated well with the sweetness. Body heavy and brain fuzzy energy. The overall weightiness combined with exhaustion had me stop at 4 steeps with the intention of brewing it out the following day, but I didn’t really find myself looking forward to it.

I don’t know the harvest/roast year but maybe this tea needs more time for the roasty char notes to settle. As it is, this Chi Ye is an ok tea but doesn’t jive with me, hence the lower rating.

Flavors: Bitter, Burnt Sugar, Char, Drying, Honey, Metallic, Orange Blossom, Roasted, Stonefruit, Sweet

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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