2010 Nan Jian Certified Organic Ripe Pu-erh

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Sold in
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Thomas Edward(Toad)
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 45 sec 5 g 8 oz / 236 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Nice tasting affordable pu-erh, These have taste of earthiness at first and sweetness follows, pleasant aroma that smells slightly sweet when dry and earthy but not dirty after steeped, many...” Read full tasting note
    67
  • “Ever wonder why they called it “cooked” puerh? This is one of the most unusual teas I’ve ever tried. I was expecting the “mini brick” to be the size of, say, a small paperback book. Instead, it’s...” Read full tasting note
    85

From Yunnan Sourcing

These mini bricks are made from Wu Liang Mountain and Lincang area Certified Organic material. Gong Ting Grade, Grade 1 and Grade 3 ripe teas were used.
Nan Jian Tu Lin tea factory has a long history of (more than 30 years) producing Pu-erh teas. Their productions are often similiar to Xiaguan productions in their choice of raw materials, blending and processing techniques. Tulin brand fermented teas are well-known for their balanced flavor and sweet after-taste and complex flavor. A great choice for an everyday drinking ripe pu-erh tea.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

67
541 tasting notes

Nice tasting affordable pu-erh, These have taste of earthiness at first and sweetness follows, pleasant aroma that smells slightly sweet when dry and earthy but not dirty after steeped, many infusions with short steeps.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec
Ginkosan

Sounds good. I got a bonus one of these with my last order, waiting for slightly cooler weather before I break into it. Excited for dark-tea drinking season.

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85
5 tasting notes

Ever wonder why they called it “cooked” puerh?
This is one of the most unusual teas I’ve ever tried. I was expecting the “mini brick” to be the size of, say, a small paperback book. Instead, it’s smaller than a pack of cigarettes! Very densely packed too, and very ripe. The dry tea smells lovely, like fragrant tobacco. And the brewed tea tastes something like tobacco too. Another review I read somewhere called it “ashy” and I think that’s accurate. It tastes roasted, almost burnt. It’s not smoky, exactly, but I think “ashy” is a good description. Or maybe charcoal. There’s no fishiness in it, but there is very little fresh tea taste left. Instead, it tastes very very “cooked.” And I don’t know if it is me, but the wet leaves give off a peculiar smell I can only describe as kind of like petroleum, or turpentine, or linseed oil. I started to think this stuff was so composted it was on its way to becoming crude oil. I’m not saying I don’t like it though. It’s just very strong and a little peculiar. I’ve only been into puerh for a few months, but I’ve tried probably a dozen ripe teas, and this was the most unusual. Let me know if you have the same experience I did, especially with regards to the smell.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 8 OZ / 236 ML

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