90's Liu An Tea from Anhui

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Earth, Dirt, Fruity, Wet Rocks
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by shakirah1984
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Tea Swap Session/Brief Notes Unfortunately, I was mostly focusing on gaming at this point, but I noted that this was a very “nice aged, earthy tea.” I wanted to make a quick note just to make sure...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “I almost finished this packet and never wrote about it. I got a 50g sample of this about 4-5 months ago, and it’s about gone, so this must be the 8th or so session I’ve had with it. This tea...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Anhui varietal of black tea processed in the traditional “wo dui” method. “Wo dui” or fermentation piling process is a precursor to the method used to produced ripe pu-erh. This basket of tea has been aged roughly 15 years and produces a aromatic almost sweet liquor with a deep copper-red color. As you drink this tea smell the cup (between pours) and you will be rewarded with rich and spicy aroma.

Pictured basket is 5 kilograms, which is available for purchase. This tea is also available for purchase in smaller quantities.

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2 Tasting Notes

80
342 tasting notes

Tea Swap Session/Brief Notes

Unfortunately, I was mostly focusing on gaming at this point, but I noted that this was a very “nice aged, earthy tea.” I wanted to make a quick note just to make sure I have one…I may forget to make notes on the last of the tea later on…..

Flavors: Earth

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54 tasting notes

I almost finished this packet and never wrote about it. I got a 50g sample of this about 4-5 months ago, and it’s about gone, so this must be the 8th or so session I’ve had with it.

This tea smells and tastes powerfully of dirt, or maybe wet stone. Seriously, drinking this has deeply warped my tastes, so that I no longer consider heavy humid storage to be a deal-breaker defect.

The leaf is dark brown nondescript lumps and bits strongly reminiscent of shu.

I used 5.5 g of leaf with a “standard gaiwan” and near-boiling water. 1 rinse of ~10 sec followed by short infusions, a couple each of 5, 10, 15s. The rinse smells of dirt, the gaiwan lid of wet stone. The taste changes from dirt to wet rocks over the first few infusions, and there is a slight mouth coating that becomes a little fruity. By about the 5th or so steep it’s getting pretty astringent, and soon the dark soup begins to lighten up some. There is some definite pore-opening perspiration-inducing power with this tea. Even at the 10th or 12th steep, each cup raises a fresh sweat. Eventually it becomes light-copper, stone-tasting, slightly sweet astringent water, after maybe 14-15 steeps.

I don’t think this tea has the staying power of some older raw puer, but on the other hand I have not tried brewing 8g of it at once. This tea is probably worth trying just as an example of 20-year-aged tea, but might be too humid for some. I’m interested in finding an example of the type that has drier storage, I think.

Flavors: Dirt, Fruity, Wet Rocks

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
Matu

The only aged heicha I have had some very humid storage taste to it as well. I’m airing it out right now.

aardvarkcheeselog

It will do a job darkening up the craquelure in your ruyao ware. I don’t think it ever airs out, really.

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