2014 Yunnan Sourcing Wu Liang Mountain Wild Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Cake, Cream, Orchid, Vegetal, Bitter, Lemon, Campfire, Honey, Smoke, Spices, Spicy, Sweet
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Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 min, 0 sec 6 g 8 oz / 242 ml

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6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “What I enjoy about this tea is its body. Aroma-wise, it’s not the headiest (at least at age 3), though the wet leaf smells a lot like a Taiwanese oolong in its latter, more vegetal steeps. There’s...” Read full tasting note
  • “I’ve already reviewed this tea and noted its clean, sweet profile but I just figured out why I’m so enamored of this tea: the wu liang is as dissimilar from green tea as a sheng is likely to get,...” Read full tasting note
  • “I’ve been wanting to try quality Wuliang sheng for a while and my samples just arrived last week. I noticed my experience with this tea is quite different from previous reviews. I pick up barely...” Read full tasting note
    84
  • “4 g Gaiwan. Dry leaf: Med/high compression; dark leaves. Wet leaf: Complex. Dark and citrus fruits sit on top of a smouldering straw dark base. Summary: Bitter sweet lemons, which is interesting in...” Read full tasting note
    75

From Yunnan Sourcing

This tea is made entirely from first flush of spring 2014 high altitude Wu Liang mountain tea. The Wu Liang mountains peak out at about 3300 meters, making them the highest mountains in Simao prefecture. The Wu Liang mountain range is in the county of Jingdong which borders both Lincang and Dali prefectures. This tea is grown in the area of Wu Liang known as Zhong Cang village (中仓村) at an altitude of 2300 meters making this some of the highest altitude pu-erh in existance. Due to the high altitude most of the tea trees in this area are a naturally occurring hybrid of large and small leaf (sinensis and var. assamica). The trees are healthy 200 year old trees growing naturally on steep hillsides and ridges. These tea gardens are arguably some of the remotest tea gardens in all of Yunnan. Lack of roads and access has kept the environment of this area in good condition, mao cha prices are significantly lower than comparable Banna teas, making this an affordable yet.

The tea itself is aromatic with hints of orchid aroma (兰香), and a strong mouth-feel. Even when young this tea is full in the mouth giving the drinker a persistent warmth and lubricated mouth feel. It brews evenly across 10 to 15 infusions never too harsh and neither dropping off suddenly, thus revealing the healthy characteristics of the trees and environment from which it came. This tea will develop gracefully through years building its character and providing the drinker with ever more complex textures.

Nice and prolonged mouthfeel couple with noticeable but not overpowering cha qi. Very infusable!

This tea was compressed in a small tea factory near Kunming where stone presses were used. Low temperature drying (about 35C) was used to dry these cakes after the compression process thus preserving their integrity! The cakes are wrapped in Dai Minority hand-made paper and then bundled into bamboo leaf “tongs” with seven cakes per tong.

In total just 140 kilograms of this tea has been produced

Net Weight: 400 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)
Harvest time: Late March 2014
Harvest Area: Zhong Cang village of Wu Liang mountains, Jingdong county of Simao

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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6 Tasting Notes

5 tasting notes

What I enjoy about this tea is its body. Aroma-wise, it’s not the headiest (at least at age 3), though the wet leaf smells a lot like a Taiwanese oolong in its latter, more vegetal steeps. There’s no smoke and very little bitterness or astringency. It seems to need to be pushed a little. But around the third steeping, it begins rolling around on the tongue like cream, and clings to the back of the mouth, a tiny bit of camphor, a little spice and pancake batter.

Flavors: Cake, Cream, Orchid, Vegetal

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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189 tasting notes

I’ve already reviewed this tea and noted its clean, sweet profile but I just figured out why I’m so enamored of this tea: the wu liang is as dissimilar from green tea as a sheng is likely to get, and not being a big fan of green teas, this is a great characteristic. Very consistent, no bitterness, sweet but with a little bit of fruity bite, this is more like an oolong than most shengs. An excellent tea to drink right now.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 130 ML
JC

I’ve had this cake for a WHILE now and I haven’t tried it. But I’ve heard good things so far.

Doug F

Yeah, it’s not a “wow, this is the most amazing, complex sheng in the world” kind of tea, but it’s really nice to drink, very easy to brew and you can taste the purity of the leaves and the fact that they grew in such a remote, pristine environment.

JC

Yeah, Wu Lian is never flashy, but I’ve had really good examples of it. I’ll dig this one out this week. I did end up buying a 2015 Huang Shang cake from YS in his last discount. I hope there aren’t any other specials before the holidays, I need to buy presents before I’m Puerh tempted! lol

Doug F

I know. I just ordered a bunch of black tea and the green miracle from Scott’s US site with the 15% discount, but there are so many others I want.

JC

I started putting things on my cart and then I looked in horror, partly because the amount I had accumulated and partly because I knew I needed to start taking a few things off it. lol

Doug F

That’s what I do. Build up and shave off.

Ginkosan

Damn Scott’s Hongcha is what’s up.

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84
142 tasting notes

I’ve been wanting to try quality Wuliang sheng for a while and my samples just arrived last week.

I noticed my experience with this tea is quite different from previous reviews. I pick up barely any bitterness until the 5th steep. Dry leaf has a sweet, candy-like aroma and wet leaf has that musky, orchid-like, deep forest fragrance. The first few steeps have notes of sweet peach, honey, and tannin. It’s very smooth and leaves a pleasantly sweet finish lasting more than a few minutes. Following steeps are similar to the first one except gradually reveal subtle tobacco and woodsy notes. Prominent honey and ripe peach notes, with increasingly more tannin, minerals, and cedar wood in the 5th and 6th steeps. Astringency is minimal and the flavors continue to please past the 7th steep.

Honestly, I find this tea to be less interesting than those from the Lincang, Baoshan, and Dehong regions. I’m just not into very sweet teas. The 2014 Qing Mei Shan is just as sweet, but has a much more impressive aftertaste that I got me considering to put some money down. Also, despite its name, this one also doesn’t have that wild tea tree element YS’s other teas have, but it’s very enjoyable to drink now.

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75
91 tasting notes

4 g Gaiwan.

Dry leaf: Med/high compression; dark leaves.
Wet leaf: Complex. Dark and citrus fruits sit on top of a smouldering straw dark base.

Summary: Bitter sweet lemons, which is interesting in flavour and experience.

So this is high mountain pu erh, grown in the remotest gardens in Yunnan. I’ll remember that when I’m drinking it.

5s – It has a similar bright crisp sweetness that Taiwanese High Mountain Dayuling Oolong has. Slightly lemony; very faint smoke. It makes me feel refreshed, and it gives a droning light buzz as it lingers after the swallow. Dido singing Stan has come into my head.
10s – Pale yellow liquor. Thick syrupy mouthfeel. Edging towards honey and lemon cough medicine. It has a steady flavour profile, with good body and a lingering finish, which stimulates the top of my head and behind my ears.
I’m seeing similarities to Hai Lang Hao “Cha Wang” 2010 by Yunnan Sourcing, which is nearly 8 times the price; however, this tea does not have amongst other things the complex layering I observed in the Cha Wang.
15s – Spritely lemon, bitter lemon bitterness, oscillating between sweet and bitter on the finish, sometimes drying.
20s – It develops intensity, even though it is a delicately flavoured floral tea and at times the experience is stronger than the flavour of the tea.
25s – Enjoyable; smooth’ish.
40s – Bitter sweet lemony.
Note: This tea came free with my first order from Yunnan Sourcing – thanks!
A previous session with this tea failed; most likely due to the new kettle. It went like this: 2 rinses, then 30 minutes rest with the lid ajar. Tasted off; abandoned notes for this session.

Flavors: Bitter, Lemon

Preparation
4 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
mrmopar

On the list it goes. Thanks for a great review of it.

tea123

I’m glad I can contribute. Tea, and especially pu erh, is something I enjoy sharing.
I was skeptical about Steepster after reading marshaln’s critique on it and more recently TeaDB’s view on it, but without other people’s opinions on tea I wouldn’t have made my orders to White2Tea or Yunnan Sourcing; plus, I need some more recommendations for my next order :)

DigniTea

I know that you were addressing your comment to Mopar but I hope you do not mind a few ideas from me. Now that the sort feature is working on Steepster cupboards, if you sort mine by company you will see that I am a big fan of both YS and W2T. It seems that you drink mostly shengs, so I focus on these.
YUNNAN Sourcing
2010 YS YiBang Ancient Arbor
2010 YS NanNuo Ya Kou
2010 YS Big Snow Mountain
2011 YS Xi Kong Autumn (surprisingly good for Autumn harvest)
2011 YS Ban Po Lao Zhai
also 2007 Boyou ManLuDa Shan Mengsong (rec. by both Hobbes & Jakub)

WHITE 2 TEA
2007 Repave
2014 54-46
2002 white Whale
2014 46&2
2011 Taochaju Yiwu
1990’s Hong Kong Style (Wet) Storage Aged Raw is also quite nice

also if he restocks these:
2003 Keyi Xing
2012 Giant Steps
2014 Apple Scruffs

tea123

No I don’t mind the recommendations. I’m pleased to see you have two teas on that list that I have tried before. I was hoping to see your reviews on them, but I couldn’t find them?
I have been drinking mostly shengs :)

DigniTea

I do not write a tea note every time I have a tea – sometimes after the 1st session and sometimes after a later session. Eventually they are likely to all be covered but there’s no telling when.

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90
673 tasting notes

this tea is quite bitter sweet with a honey, spicy and slight smoky taste even though me and grandma forgot to rinse it first.

thank you Scott Wilson and Yunnan sourcing for this interesting tea. :)

Flavors: Bitter, Campfire, Honey, Smoke, Spices, Spicy, Sweet

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 3 min, 0 sec 5 g 25 OZ / 750 ML

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