2014 Yunnan Sourcing Mang Fei Mountain Old Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea
Flavors
Grain, Grass, Hay, Rye, Butter, Floral, Fruity, Sweet
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Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Dylan
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 g 3 oz / 87 ml

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6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Have sampled this tea twice now. The most enduring quality of this tea is certainly the pleasant, dampening buzz, it must have a high amount of theanine. The aromas and flavors are a little more...” Read full tasting note
    89
  • “This is a strong and bittersweet sheng. It had a strong bitter note for the first six steeps with a sweet note behind it. It developed into a nice sweet sheng although I don’t know if I would use...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “What a gu shu this is! Thiiiiick body, active/pleasurable mouthfeel, powerful aftertaste, and impressive qi that had me tea drunk after the 3rd steep and does not give way until the 10th or so...” Read full tasting note
  • “I’ve been drinking through a bunch of old YS samples this weekend and this was the next tea up. The sample bag has been open (tied with rubber band) in my pumidor for seven months. My first...” Read full tasting note
    92

From Yunnan Sourcing

Entirely old arbor tea from early spring 2014! Tea leaves taken from oldest tea trees (150 to 300 years old) growing on Mang Fei mountain in Yong De county of Lincang. Full and stout one leaf to one bud ratio tea leaves. Mang Fei wild arbor tea has pronounced hairy buds and stout stems. The brewed leaves are a dark olive color.

The brewed tea is strong and full in the mouth with some astringency (as is typical of Lincang teas). The tea soup has a strong heavy aroma and cha qi. The tea can easily be brewed 10 times or more and still give off flavor. Incredibly high quality spring tea, which is strong, potent and very infusable!

Each cake is stone-pressed by traditional method and dried with low temperature air drying.

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6 Tasting Notes

89
240 tasting notes

Have sampled this tea twice now. The most enduring quality of this tea is certainly the pleasant, dampening buzz, it must have a high amount of theanine. The aromas and flavors are a little more confused and muddled, but overall it’s a thick-bodied tea with lots of strength. Rinsed leaves smell potent and the first few steeps give graininess, phytochemicals, and minerals. Moderate astringency and bitterness. I see this tea having good aging potential. I’d give it a higher score if the soup was a bit sweeter and if the flavor profile was more distinct.

Flavors: Grain, Grass, Hay, Rye

Preparation
5 g 3 OZ / 85 ML

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86
1758 tasting notes

This is a strong and bittersweet sheng. It had a strong bitter note for the first six steeps with a sweet note behind it. It developed into a nice sweet sheng although I don’t know if I would use the word apricots. It was very good overall.

I steeped this ten times in a 75ml teapot with 5g leaf and boiling water. I gave it a 10 second rinse. I steeped it for 5 sec, 5 sec, 7 sec, 10 sec, 15 sec, 20 sec, 25 sec, 30 sec, 45 sec, and 1 minute.

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 3 OZ / 75 ML

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142 tasting notes

What a gu shu this is! Thiiiiick body, active/pleasurable mouthfeel, powerful aftertaste, and impressive qi that had me tea drunk after the 3rd steep and does not give way until the 10th or so steep. The kuwei is excellent—turning into a complex bitter/floral huigan that expands to all corners of the mouth and throat, and remains long after the tea is drunk.

Unlike the 2013 version, there is virtually no smoke, so Mang Fei Shan tea’s characteristics are well showcased. Initial 2 steeps are surprisingly sweet with notes of raw honey and sugar cane, but are then followed by those infamous whisky-like astringent notes, sandalwood, and tobacco. This is a nice contrast to the more gentle shengs I’ve recently acquired. Should be fun to see how this evolves.

mrmopar

The 2009 is a good one as well. I tend to like these Bulang and Mang Fei and Lao Man E’s that I have tried. I like the bitter hit.

tanluwils

Fortunately, I can still afford Mang fei teas, at least for now. I haven’t fond any good Bulang teas in my price range yet.

mrmopar

The Guan Zi Zai from TU is a bit over $50.00 and YS has a 2013 Autumn in about the same price range. I think being close to Lao Ban Zhang has driven this terrior up in prices as well.

tanluwils

Have you tried the Ming Qian Chun Jian (Bulang Mountains 2008) from The Phoenix Collection?

mrmopar

Haven’t had that one yet.

JC

I need to buy some stuff from TU, but I haven’t got the money for now. I do have the Bulang from Phonenix Collection but you do have to consider that after 4-5 years, it is my storage you are tasting vs what they have.

tanluwils

JC, thanks for the note. I would like to try it for my own tea edification, if anything. Do you have your original notes from when you first tried it? I’m curious how it’s evolved since then.

I’ve also hit my annual budget hard as well after my last purchase, but you were right to suggest to purchase more of the huangshan before prices went up. I don’t regret my decision.

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92
316 tasting notes

I’ve been drinking through a bunch of old YS samples this weekend and this was the next tea up. The sample bag has been open (tied with rubber band) in my pumidor for seven months.

My first impression on sniffing the cup is that it smells a bit like cinnamon rolls. The taste is spicy, rich, and sweet, with lots of spice in the finish. Hints of raisins. Thick; feels almost chewy in the mouth. Feeling some cha qi. 2nd steep: the nose is still spicy. The cha qi from the first cup is really hitting me. Taste is similar to 1st cup but not exciting me as much, perhaps because I’m so anxious to taste it that I’m drinking it too hot. 3rd steep is much more integrated than the earlier steeps. Hard to describe the flavor, but it evokes baked goods, though with an apricot fruit hiding underneath. Very good texture and big finish. Lots of cha qi. Shows a slightly bitter astringency at the finish. 4th (30s): Now that I’m looking for it, I detect a hint of apricot in the nose. Taste is smoother and sweeter and the finish isn’t as astringent. The cha qi is powerful: I’m taking 20 minute breaks every two steeps to let it die down.

This is the type of tea that I prefer: slightly fruity, not bitter, with complex flavors. All three components (smell, taste, finish) work very well together and the texture is excellent.

After I posted this review I discovered a prior review from 7 months ago. I suspect the differences between the two reviews is at least partly due to the pumidor storage, which makes me feel good.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 2 g 2 OZ / 59 ML

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92
187 tasting notes

Dry – Sweet, Bitter floral, Fruits, some vegetal/faintly tobacco, fresh.
Wet – Very sweet scent, fruity, creamy and somewhat buttery in scent, vegetal, bitter-floral with some tobacco notes.
Liquor – Yellow, very faint green hue.

Initial steeps are very aromatic with matching taste. The liquor is immediately sweet with balancing ‘tart’ fruity notes and a very pleasant creamy/buttery character up front. The initial thickness/buttery body becomes smoothness as it goes down and develops bittersweet-floral notes and minor astringency. Some tobacco notes are present but only faintly, though it becomes slightly more apparent as you continue to steep.

Following steeps (4+) the body still has a good thickness, but feels rather smoother than thick (changed from creamy to buttery if that helps). The initial notes are very similar, with some savory notes appearing in the middle like steamed vegetables and tobacco/medicinal notes, but never overtaking the initial nots. The astringency is still present at the end, but still remains pleasant.

Later steeps tend to be a bit lighter, but not departed from the initial notes with only shifting of the notes, appearing floral-bitter, fruity with thickness upfront and becoming more mellow and sweet and smooth as it goes down. The astringency is more apparent, it doesn’t bother me yet, but it might be a bit too dry for some people past the 8-9? steep. Still very pleasant mouthfeel.

Final Notes
I really liked this Puerh, it offers a filling and satisfying thickness.The notes were always mellow and gentle, even though it is a young Sheng. I usually lean towards Aged Sheng and ripe during Winter season, but it delivered what I go for this time of the year. The Huigan is pleasant, sweet-fruity with floral notes and the thickness sensation seems to linger as well.

If you have a minute, check out my blog
http://thetinmycup.blogspot.com/

Flavors: Butter, Floral, Fruity, Sweet

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 7 g 4 OZ / 130 ML
tanluwils

This sounds completely different from the 2013 version which was rougher around the edges featuring mostly herbal tobacco and smoky pine notes, but in a charming rustic way. I ordered a sample of the 2014, so it will be very interesting to experience the difference.

JC

I haven’t tried the 2013 version, but I would make sense that those older harvest are more potent. I liked that this one started mellow but it becomes stronger with each steep. I think I order a cake or two on my last order.

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