2015 Yunnan Sourcing Wu Liang Mountain Wild Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apricot, Green Beans, Sage, Malt, Tobacco
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by Ginkosan
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 100 oz / 2957 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This was my first full Sheng Cake, and i’m really pleased with it. Massive sweetness with little astringency has made it a hit with my Puerh uninitiated friends too. 2 washes, then steeped (sec)...” Read full tasting note
  • “Wu Liang remains a value champion. Incredibly smooth, buttery tea with almost perfect processing. Wu Liang terroir still is incredibly indistinguishable from Menghai terroir for me… Its dense,...” Read full tasting note
    85

From Yunnan Sourcing

his tea is made entirely from first flush of spring 2015 high altitude Wu Liang mountain tea. The Wu Liang mountains peak out at about 3300 meters, making them the highest mountains in Simao prefecture. The Wu Liang mountain range is in the county of Jingdong which borders both Lincang and Dali prefectures. This tea is grown in the area of Wu Liang known as Zhong Cang village (中仓村) at an altitude of 2300 meters making this some of the highest altitude pu-erh in existance. Due to the high altitude most of the tea trees in this area are a naturally occurring hybrid of large and small leaf (sinensis and var. assamica). The trees are healthy 200 year old trees growing naturally on steep hillsides and ridges. These tea gardens are arguably some of the remotest tea gardens in all of Yunnan. Lack of roads and access has kept the environment of this area in good condition, mao cha prices are significantly lower than comparable Banna teas, making this an affordable yet.

The tea itself is aromatic with hints of orchid aroma (兰香), and a strong mouth-feel. Even when young this tea is full in the mouth giving the drinker a persistent warmth and lubricated mouth feel. It brews evenly across 10 to 15 infusions never too harsh and neither dropping off suddenly, thus revealing the healthy characteristics of the trees and environment from which it came. This tea will develop gracefully through years building its character and providing the drinker with ever more complex textures.

Nice and prolonged mouthfeel couple with noticeable but not overpowering cha qi. Very infusable!

This tea was compressed in a small tea factory near Kunming where stone presses were used. Low temperature drying (about 35C) was used to dry these cakes after the compression process thus preserving their integrity! The cakes are wrapped in Dai Minority hand-made paper and then bundled into bamboo leaf “tongs” with seven cakes per tong.

In total just 100 kilograms of this tea has been produced

Net Weight: 400 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)
Harvest time: April 2015
Harvest Area: Zhong Cang village of Wu Liang mountains, Jingdong county of Simao

This tea has been tested in a certified laboratory and has passed the MRL limits for pesticide residues as established by the EU Food and Safety commission. For more information about MRL testing and the EU Food and Safety commission click on this link.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

15 tasting notes

This was my first full Sheng Cake, and i’m really pleased with it. Massive sweetness with little astringency has made it a hit with my Puerh uninitiated friends too.
2 washes, then steeped (sec) 5,5,10,10,10,15,15,20,20,25 (still going!)
There is a mild and pleasant initial astringency, and some herbal notes (sage). Over the steeps the Huigan and also a savoury vegetal note (green beans) build. It feels kind of creamy when cooling down. By about steep 6 the stone fruit hits, crystallising into a familiar apricot by steep 7. I agree a slight aniseed note.

Flavors: Apricot, Green Beans, Sage

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 100 OZ / 2957 ML
mrmopar

Converts . converts! Teach them well!

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85
41 tasting notes

Wu Liang remains a value champion. Incredibly smooth, buttery tea with almost perfect processing. Wu Liang terroir still is incredibly indistinguishable from Menghai terroir for me… Its dense, and all apricots, tobacco, and kuwei. This seems like a terrific bargain for either drinking now or aging…

Flavors: Apricot, Malt, Tobacco

TeaExplorer

I’ve got a cake of this arriving in a few hours (if tracking info is correct). Looking forward to trying it after airing some out.

jschergen

Have you been of Scott’s older Wuliang productions? I’d be curious to hear how they’ve come along.

Ginkosan

I finished off a cake of 12 earlier this year. Was more pipe tobacco and dark straw. Definitely see these aging well…

Ginkosan

If you’re referring to base quality though I’d say (from this sample) that it seems higher. There was some wok charring on the 12 cake and I didn’t notice any on the 15. This appears to me to be true of most of his cakes…

jschergen

That’s interesting. I actually sessioned the 2015 Wuliang maybe 3 months ago against the 2012 and noted the same thing. Since I never had the 2012 before this year I wasn’t 100% sure what to make of it, but it was noticeably lower with a bit more earth notes.

tanluwils

While I yet to try more than a few Wu Liang teas. I find Menghai generally has more variety within its sub-regions. Mengsong, Hekai, Bu Lang, and Ba Da seem quite different from one another. However, I hear Xishuangbanna tea trees are suffering from over harvesting which has many implications for overall tea quality. It’s got me rethinking future tea purchases.

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