Ling Tou Village "Bai Ye" Dan Cong Oolong Tea * Spring 2016

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Cinnamon, Cranberry, Drying, Floral, Flowers, Fruity, Grass, Green Apple, Hay, Heavy, Honey, Metallic, Nutty, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Stonefruits, Sweet, Tart, Wood, Baked Bread, Butter, Citrus, Lychee, Mineral, Orange, Osmanthus, Rose, Violet, Dark Bittersweet, Fruit Tree Flowers, Grapefruit, Nectar, Orchids
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 oz / 89 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

7 Images

0 Want it Want it

5 Own it Own it

3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I haven’t been drinking much Dan Cong recently, but with the arrival of spring (finally!) I am more tempted to return to this category. This particular one is a very fragrance and texture focused...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “Here ya go. Here is another tea review from way, way back. This was another of the May sipdowns. If I am motivated, I may be able to get through the rest of the May backlog and perhaps the first...” Read full tasting note
    93
  • “This was interesting, very different from most Dancongs I have had, almost a cross between a white tea and an Oolong. Nose; Roasted barley, kumquat, plantain, savory yam, water cress. Palate; very...” Read full tasting note
    89

From Yunnan Sourcing

“Bai Ye” (lit. White Leaf) Dan Cong is grown in Ling Tou village in the north of Raoping County (Guangdong Province). Bai Ye Dan Cong varietal plants are special in curved large appearance with light yellow-green crowns. The aroma has both Flower and Honey characteristics with a heavy pungent nectar quality. The taste is thick and pure with a sweet after-finish.

Our Bai Ye dan Cong was picked in late April 2016 and processed through May. The traditional processing for Ling Tou Bai Ye Dan Cong is as follows: 1) Pick the tender shoots, typically 1 bud to 2 or 3 leaf ratio. 2) Sun wilt for 30 minutes 3) Wilt in cool shaded area for another 1 hours 4) Shaking the tea, 15 time, then 25 times, then 40 times 5) Kill green (wok frying) at 200 C (surface temperature of wok) for 4 or 5 minutes minutes with constant movement. 6) Rolling and breaking the leaf for 18 minutes. 7) Drying in hot room at 100C.

Just 15 kilograms in total produced by one family.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

83
352 tasting notes

I haven’t been drinking much Dan Cong recently, but with the arrival of spring (finally!) I am more tempted to return to this category. This particular one is a very fragrance and texture focused tea. It doesn’t shine in taste or cha qi.

Especially the aromas are incredibly complex and varying. The dry leaf smell is sweet and floral (a little bit like sheng) with notes of wood, cinnamon, orchid, beeswax, green apple and sunflower seeds. Once hit with water, it gets more fruity, thick and spicy. There are hints of cranberry, campfire, tulips and green grass at an outside pool.

The taste starts quite floral and metallic. There is generally not much bitterness, which is why I tend to brew it aggressively. I get flavours of stonefruits, nuts, peach pit, wet hay and roasted pear. It’s not a bad taste profile and I think the taste is quite well defined and memorable, but it’s not exactly my favourite. The aftertaste is not super strong, but it lasts for a very long time and it retains a lot of the tart and fruity notes.

The mouthfeel is very interesting and one the highlights for sure. It is very heavy, buttery, somewhat brassy and a little effervescent. After swallowing, the tea leaves a slick, cooling and drying feeling in the mouth.

This is clearly a high quality tea, but since the fruity taste profile is not quite my cup of tea, I rate it lower.

Flavors: Cinnamon, Cranberry, Drying, Floral, Flowers, Fruity, Grass, Green Apple, Hay, Heavy, Honey, Metallic, Nutty, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Stonefruits, Sweet, Tart, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 2 OZ / 50 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

93
837 tasting notes

Here ya go. Here is another tea review from way, way back. This was another of the May sipdowns. If I am motivated, I may be able to get through the rest of the May backlog and perhaps the first half of the June backlog by the end of the month. I’ll even try to throw in some more recent reviews as I go. That being said, all I can do at this point to wrap up this introductory paragraph is state that I loved this tea. I can still be rather hard on Dancong oolongs, but this one really did it for me.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. Oddly, I did not push this one all that hard. After a brief rinse, I steeped 6 grams of tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 8 seconds. This infusion was chased by 13 subsequent infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 10 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, and 3 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of nectarine, orchid, pomegranate, and candied pomelo. After the rinse, I noted a more intense orchid aroma and hints of lotus, honey, and osmanthus. The first infusion offered a much subtler nose, though new scents of baked bread and butter emerged. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented lovely fruity, floral, and pungent qualities with subtler savoriness. Notes of nectarine, orchid, osmanthus, pomegranate, and candied pomelo swirled all around the mouth in utterly dominating fashion until notes of honey, butter, and baked bread made themselves known. The following infusions saw the nose remain more or less intensely floral and fruity. Hints of lotus came out in the mouth while new impressions of wood, pear, lychee, rose, violet, minerals, and mandarin orange also emerged. The final infusions offered lingering impressions of minerals, wood, and pear that were balanced by hints of mandarin orange and orchid.

This tea, like so many other Dancong oolongs, demonstrated the tendency to fade pretty quickly in the mouth, but I was able to get several very satisfying sessions out of it despite the fact that my brewing method is not always kind to teas of this type. As many of you know, I have completely come around on Dancong oolongs over the course of the past year, and I found this one to be both excellent and resilient. I will definitely be checking out some of Yunnan Sourcing’s more recent Bai Ye offerings in the near future.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Butter, Citrus, Floral, Fruity, Honey, Lychee, Mineral, Orange, Orchid, Osmanthus, Pear, Rose, Stonefruits, Violet, Wood

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Daylon R Thomas

I’m looking forward to the other Dancong backlogs since I want to try some more out myself. The Iris Orchid Dancong I have is surprisingly creamier than my Taiwaneese High Mountain varietals, and I want to get back into this terroir. Bai Ye, Mi Lan, Ba Xian, Chou Shi, Song Zhong, Shui Xian, and Ya Shi are the few that I’ve had from the range and I want to try out more in small amounts. I’ve been tempted to get the samplers from Yunnan Sourcing or elsewhere, but they are inherently expensive.

derk

I’ve had a few different dancongs, brewed with heavy leaf and water temps ranging from 195 to 205 but they didn’t really do anything for me. After trying several Taiwanese high mountain oolongs, I think my palate has opened up more and after reading your review, I’m willing to give dancong oolongs another try. Thanks for sharing, eastkyteaguy.

eastkyteaguy

Daylon, I think I have tried Ya Shi Xiang, Chou Shi, Mi Lan Xiang, Zhi Lan Xiang, Ba Xian, Bai Ye, Ju Duo Zai, Yu Lan Xiang, Da Wu Ye, You Hua Xiang, Jiang Mu Xiang, and Rou Gui Xiang to this point. I find that I like my Dancongs more floral and spicy as opposed to herbal, vegetal, and earthy. I know that Ju Duo Zai and Jiang Mu Xiang did not much for me. Ya Shi Xiang has been hit or miss for me, but the ones I like, I really like. I’ve got some Shui Xian and Song Zhong dancongs in storage that I need to try before the end of the year at least.

eastkyteaguy

Derk, it seems that getting good dancong in the U.S. can be somewhat difficult. I have liked or at least appreciated the ones I have gotten from Yunnan Sourcing, What-Cha, The Tao of Tea, and Verdant Tea. I also recall getting one from Tealyra that was good and another from Unytea that I found to be pretty nice. When it comes to brewing them, I like to go with a little less leaf than a lot of traditional Chao Zhou gongfu people. From what I have read, practitioners of Chao Zhou gongfu will pack the gaiwan or pot absolutely full, flash rinse, and then flash steep repeatedly. The idea is apparently to make a strong, bitter, and astringent brew that is packed with aroma and flavor up front since even higher grade Dancong oolong does not tend to display tremendous longevity. This was my introduction to gongfu Dancong, and I found it to be nauseating. Since then, I have been lowering the amount of leaf I use per session to my more standard 4-7 grams, usually using 6 grams per 115-120 ounces, and have gotten results that are much better for me.

Daylon R Thomas

Dan Congs really do not need to be mega leafed for a great aroma and taste in my opinion. I love that I can plop 2 grams of my Iris Orchid western and still get six cups easy. Crap, I’ve forgot to list Da Wu Ye and the Zhi Lan-I’m pretty sure that the Iris Orchid from Golden Tea Leaf is a Zhi Lan based on translation and the general description of it. Anyway, that is one I’d platform for you guys to try eventually.

derk

I believe I was following the gongfu method you described and definitely got that strong, bitter, astringent brew with a quick drop off in flavor. I feel like I tend to appreciate a heavier leaf in general but your information regarding dancongs is invaluable and I will put it to use.

Leafhopper

I’m just getting into Dancongs and am finding, like many of you, that less leaf and 203-208 water temperatures are ideal. Too much bitterness and astringency aren’t great. What companies would you recommend for reasonably priced Dancongs?

eastkyteaguy

Leafhopper, I tend to favor the Dancongs offered by Yunnan Sourcing, but you can get some solid Dancongs from other vendors too. The couple of Dancongs from What-Cha that I’ve tried have been very good, but What-Cha does not tend to stock Dancongs often. Wuyi Origin surprisingly carries some nice Dancongs.

Daylon R Thomas

This is singular, but Golden Tea Leaf’s Iris Orchid Dancong is very good and unusually milky. $15 for 50 grams.

Daylon R Thomas

More specifically, I think it is a Zhi Lan.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

89
91 tasting notes

This was interesting, very different from most Dancongs I have had, almost a cross between a white tea and an Oolong.
Nose; Roasted barley, kumquat, plantain, savory yam, water cress.
Palate; very delicate, savory, molassiss, clover hay, sweetness on roof of mouth, narcissus, slightly bitter, yam, celery, kumquat.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.