2011 Gao Jia Shan "10 Years Aged Qian Liang Tea" Hunan Hei Cha

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Green Apple, Honey, Spices, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
High
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Tea in the Rain
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec 8 oz / 236 ml

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  • “Excellent tea. I am not the most stringent rinser, but, this tea does require it. I rinsed for 7 seconds. It should brew a dark golden liquor for the 1st ‘drinking’ steep. It starts off with a...” Read full tasting note
    93

From Yunnan Sourcing

Gao Jia Shan production made from 2006 Spring tea leaves. Pressed into a huge 32 kilogram column called “Qian Liang Cha” (aka 1000 catty tea) and then aged for 5 years before being cut into 1 kilogram slices and re-packaged into a wrapped 1 kilogram “cake”. The “cake” comes as part of a limited edition set in a box with 5 single serving cubes of the tea so you don’t have to break into the large cake. In the gift box is a stainless steel pick set in hardwood, which is just what you’ll need to break apart the Qian Liang cake when the time comes to drink it.

Qian Liang tea is the proto-typical “Golden Flower” tea. The tea is compressed in a long column (typically 32kg) and then allowed to dry out gradually. The moisture trapped in the inner section develops the golden flowers which flourish for a time until the inner part dries enough to halt them.

The taste is spicy, sweet, thick, with hints of brewer’s yeast and mushrooms. Really kind of difficult to describe.

Spring 2006 harvest tea leaves (Packed in 2011)

1 kilogram section of Qian Liang Tea, 5 sample cubes, and a pick.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

93
26 tasting notes

Excellent tea. I am not the most stringent rinser, but, this tea does require it. I rinsed for 7 seconds. It should brew a dark golden liquor for the 1st ‘drinking’ steep. It starts off with a spicy, woodsy (carpenter’s shop) taste. The spice taste ends abruptly but the woodsy taste stays consistently and develops honey notes in the middle. The ending is what makes this tea special; the spice taste returns and the honey notes evolve into green apple. This spiced apple (cinnamon + nutmeg or apple spice) aftertaste lingers on the tongue for awhile. The tea has a medium boldness, and is fairly smooth but with subtle astringency as well (which becomes more pronounced in later steeps). I thoroughly enjoyed the intense complexity, and ‘nature’ flavors present in this tea. There is no noticeable wet soil taste, just a deep wood flavor. In the later steeps the spice/apple flavors diminish and the ‘woodsy’ flavor remains strong. A great tea for anyone who is looking to expand their aged tea repertoire….though I wouldn’t recommend it as someone’s first crack at fermented/aged teas. Might add more to this later.

Flavors: Green Apple, Honey, Spices, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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