Classic "Gan Zao Ye" Wild Jujube Tea from Laoshan Village * Spring 2017

Tea type
Herbal Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Baked Bread, Butter, Carrot, Grass, Herbaceous, Honey, Mineral, Mushrooms, Roasted Barley, Seaweed, Soybean, Spinach, Sugarcane, Toasted Rice, Umami, Vanilla, Vegetal, Walnut, Milk, Oats
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 oz / 119 ml

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  • “This was my most recent sipdown as I finished my 25g pouch last night. The weather here changed very suddenly a couple days ago, and since I have been once again dealing with sinus issues as a...” Read full tasting note
    95

From Yunnan Sourcing

Gan Zao Ye (甘枣叶) or Wild Jujube Tea is a herbal tea made from wild jujube plants picked in the spring of this year in Laoshan Village area of Shandong. Laoshan Village is also the home to some wonderful green and black teas. Wild Jujube grows at an altitude of 600-1000 meters and is picked in the month of April and May

Wild Jujube has been used for centuries as a sleep aid, combatting anxiety and depression. In addition to being a nerve tonic, it’s also caffeine-free (but high in L-Theanine) making it the perfect tea to enjoy in the evenings or any other time when seeking a tranquil state of mind.

The taste is soupy and very thick, it has notes of barley, jiaogulan-like sweetness, and long-lasting rich taste. The aroma is fruity and very sweet, filling the room with a baked fruitcake type aroma.

Our Imperial Grade Gan Zao Ye is picked when the leaves are young and tender in April and May and then carefully processed to preserve their fine state. The Classic Wild Jujube is larger leaf than the Imperial grade, and also has a more robust flavor and thick tea soup. Medicinally speaking this is the more powerful of the two types we offer. Some people will prefer this one to the Imperial Grade we offer here

Recommended brewing:

Strainer Brewing – 85C Spring Water – Put 6 grams in a strainer atop a glass cha hai (公道杯) and slowly pour the water over the tea letting it drain into the cha hai. Keep adding water slowly until the tea loses it’s flavor.

Gong Fu Brewing – 85C Spring Water – Put 5 grams per 100ml gaiwan or glass teapot and brew with a 10 second infusion for the first steeping, then add 10 seconds for each subsequent infusion.

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1 Tasting Note

95
900 tasting notes

This was my most recent sipdown as I finished my 25g pouch last night. The weather here changed very suddenly a couple days ago, and since I have been once again dealing with sinus issues as a result, I have been spending a tremendous amount of time nursing hot beverages. Not wanting to cause ridiculous insomnia, I have been consuming tisanes in the evening. Though I do not go out of my way to drink it often, I am a huge fan of wild jujube. I am happy to report that I found this one to be an excellent offering.

I prepared this tisane gongfu style. After a brief rinse, I steeped 6 grams of jujube leaf in 4 ounces of 185 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was chased by 18 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, 10 minutes, and 15 minutes. I actually could have kept going for at least one or two more infusions, but I decided to stop where I did because it was getting late.

Prior to the rinse, the dry jujube leaves emitted aromas of toasted rice, toasted walnut, spinach, turnip greens, and roasted Brussels sprouts. After the rinse, I noted new aromas of collard greens and roasted carrots. The first infusion brought out a subtle roasted barley scent. In the mouth, I noted unexpected mushroom notes along with the expected impressions of turnip greens, spinach, collard greens, and roasted Brussels sprouts. Notes of ginseng, honey, vanilla, sugarcane, and toasted walnut started out as hints of flavor lingering in the background before coming out powerfully on the finish. Subsequent infusions introduced aromas of vanilla, ginseng, sugarcane, mushroom, honey, and seaweed. Notes of toasted rice, roasted carrot, and roasted barley emerged alongside impressions of baked bread, soybean, umami, seaweed, butter, minerals, grass, and radish. By the time I ended my review session, I was still picking up on notes of umami, minerals, butter, roasted barley, spinach, turnip greens, and toasted walnut that were balanced by hints of roasted Brussels sprouts, collard greens, mushroom, sugarcane, vanilla, and ginseng.

An almost unbelievably aromatic and flavorful tisane, I currently wish that I had purchased more of this when I had the money. This made for an excellent evening hot beverage that had the added benefit of temporarily clearing my sinuses while also serving as a sleep aid. If I were to directly compare it to anything, I would compare it to vegetable soup broth. I always crave vegetable soup when I am sick and/or when the weather starts to turn cold, so this really hit the spot for me. Definitely make a point of trying this offering if you are at all into Chinese herbal brews.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Butter, Carrot, Grass, Herbaceous, Honey, Mineral, Mushrooms, Roasted Barley, Seaweed, Soybean, Spinach, Sugarcane, Toasted Rice, Umami, Vanilla, Vegetal, Walnut

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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