2013 Bai Sha Xi "Run Zhi Fu" Fu Zhuan tea from Hunan

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Alcohol, Apple, Baked Bread, Earth, Grain, Honey, Medicinal, Metallic, Pastries, Soybean, Spices, Sweet, Yeast
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I recently bought a hei cha sampler in order to expand my knowledge of these teas. Having tried all of them, I can now document my thoughts. They all have a very comforting quality, and this...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “This was a pit stop along a brief hei cha journey that actually began over a year ago. I sampled some tian jian a while ago and enjoyed it, so I invested in another tian jian, some liu bao, and...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Bai Sha Xi Tea Factory in Anhua County of Hunan is the earliest producer of “Dark Tea” (hei cha) in Hunan and the first to produce the Golden Flower bricks in China. Bai Sha Xi was established in 1940 to product Hei Cha bricks, then in 1953 they produced the first Fu Brick with Golden Flowers.

This production commerates 120 years since Mao Zedong’s birth. Mao Zedong is a Hunan native and was an avid tea drinker. If he were here today he would certainly feel great pride when reflecting on the development of the Hunan tea industry!

This 1000 gram tea brick is composed entirely of spring harvest material from An Hua county area mountainous tea gardens. The tea was fermented using Bai Sha Xi’s proprietary process, then pressed into bricks where the golden flowers flourish in the inner section of the brick where the conditions are just right to support them. After a few days the Golden Flowers have thrived the bricks are dried gradually using a temperature of 37C which preserves gradually halts the spread of the flowers without damaging them or the tea leaves.

The brewed tea is orange in color. The taste is sweet, thick, with notes of dried fruit, hay and mushrooms. Very lubricating in the mouth and throat with a mild and comfortable feeling in body.

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2 Tasting Notes

83
447 tasting notes

I recently bought a hei cha sampler in order to expand my knowledge of these teas. Having tried all of them, I can now document my thoughts. They all have a very comforting quality, and this particular one especially.

The aroma is fairly complex with notes of honey in dry leaf; sweet bread, yeast, fermented apples, earth and some medicinal smell in wet leaves. Taste is quite well defined and stable with a sweet metallic character and a very spicy aftertaste. I notice flavours like those of fermented grains and soy beans. The liquor has a medium body and a smooth, fleeting mouthfeel.

This is a very nice tea that is well defined, which means it can be quite memorable and suited to specific scenarios. It is not my favourite from the hei cha sampler at the moment though.

Flavors: Alcohol, Apple, Baked Bread, Earth, Grain, Honey, Medicinal, Metallic, Pastries, Soybean, Spices, Sweet, Yeast

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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167 tasting notes

This was a pit stop along a brief hei cha journey that actually began over a year ago. I sampled some tian jian a while ago and enjoyed it, so I invested in another tian jian, some liu bao, and some fu just to get some bearings on the hei cha world.

Much like my liu bao experience, my fu experience has required some getting used to. It is very yeasty and grainy – almost starchy – and not at all what you get from any other tea.

It’s not bad; in fact, it is intriguing because of how different it is. I had an easier time aligning tian jian with hong cha (sort of), and liu bao with ripe pu’erh. This guy, though, stands alone. Imagine putting a little brewer’s yeast into a black tea breakfast blend and you get sort of close.

Anyway, I would certainly recommend this to anyone who really enjoys exploring the breadth and depth of Chinese teas. Because it is so different from everything else, it is a necessary pit stop. It took me a full year to wrap my head around it, and I still am, to be honest. Probably not a re-purchase for me, but I’m holding a little back so I can revisit it in another year or so.
*
Dry leaf: brewer’s yeast, black tea breakfast blend. In preheated vessel – stronger aromas as before, with notes of starchy cooked yam, and hints of grape syrup and bruleed sugar

Smell: brewer’s yeast, cooked yam, dry spices

Taste: brewer’s yeast, milky mild black tea breakfast blend, hints of dark caramel. Aftertaste of hardwood, cream of wheat, with hints of lemongrass.

tanluwils

Have you tried Tibetan Kang brick or Yi Qing Yuan chunks Scott sells? They’re also quite special! Probably less yeasty and more smooth medicinal notes.

apefuzz

No, I haven’t. Thanks for the recommendations!

apefuzz

By the way, Scott just added this for those want to embark on their own hei cha journey: https://yunnansourcing.com/collections/new-products/products/hei-cha-sampler-guangxi-liu-bao-and-hunan-fu-brick

tanluwils

Yes, I’ve seen this one. I need to try the last one in particular – 2012 Gao Jia Shan “Wild Tian Jian”. The other TJs I’ve had from Scott are really interesting teas. Do you prefer any particular hei cha?

apefuzz

I can’t say I prefer anything in particular just yet. I do have some liu bao lined up for my next YS purchase. I was surprised at the quality of the experience. I have to check out your recommendations too.

Rasseru

The kang tea is waaaay different from Fu bricks, it doesnt have the yeast/cake dough thing going on at all, more of a clean fruitier.

I cant get my head around this type of tea either. I bought one and try it every once in a while and ponder it, then move on

tanluwils

Tibetan kang zhuan was the first tea I had in China that I actually wanted to purchase more of. Before that, I had only known ripe pu’er served at dim sum restaurants and jasmine green tea, which I don’t care for. Tibetan kang zhuan is probably my favorite heicha. It’s got a smooth, clean, sweet, medicinal quality to it that’s different from aged pu’er.

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