Traditional Process Dian Hong Black tea of Feng Qing * Spring 2018

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Anise, banana, Black Pepper, Bread, Butter, Camphor, Caramel, Cedar, Cinnamon, Clove, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Earth, Eucalyptus, Grapes, Herbaceous, Honey, Leather, Lemon Zest, Malt, Mineral, Molasses, Nutty, Orange Zest, Peanut, Pine, Plum, Red Apple, Smoke, Sugarcane, Vanilla, Walnut, Chocolate
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is probably going to be the last review I will post today since I am running short on time. I am still limited to only using the business office’s computer on which to do my writing, and it...” Read full tasting note
    90
  • “This is a tea without any flaws and any strengths. It looks good, it smells good, it has a large amount of golden tips. The taste is a very typical for a Dian Hong: bitter-sweet chocolate, malt,...” Read full tasting note
    75

From Yunnan Sourcing

Processed with very light oxidization and roasting this Feng Qing area tea has a strong taste with some astringency and a long floral sweet after-taste. This tea will continue to age and develop over the years.

Excellent choice for longer-term storage or just longer shelf-life for the lazy tea drinker!

Spring 2018 (Mid-March Harvested)

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

90
1026 tasting notes

This is probably going to be the last review I will post today since I am running short on time. I am still limited to only using the business office’s computer on which to do my writing, and it seems that I can now no longer make it into town without my parents giving me errands to run for them. Getting back on track here, this was another of my more recent sipdowns, as I finished my 50g pouch of this tea early last week. The Traditional Process Dian Hong is another of Yunnan Sourcing’s regular offerings that never seems to disappoint me, and this tea did not buck that trend. As a matter of fact, it did not even come close to bucking that trend.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea buds in 4 ounces of 194 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was followed by 19 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 sconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea buds emitted aromas of malt, honey, cedar, baked bread, cinnamon, dark chocolate, and sugarcane. After the rinse, I picked up aromas of roasted almond, eucalyptus, camphor, roasted peanut, black pepper, and anise. The first infusion brought out a clove aroma and a subtle vanilla scent. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of malt, cream, dark chocolate, roasted almond, roasted peanut, baked bread, and butter that were balanced by hints of roasted cashew, honey, sugarcane, and vanilla. The bulk of the subsequent infusions introduced aromas of earth, pine, juniper, lemon zest, banana, red apple, plum, roasted cashew, leather, orange zest, roasted walnut, and smoke. Stronger and more immediately notable impressions of roasted cashew, honey, sugarcane, and vanilla came out in the mouth alongside impressions of earth, minerals, leather, smoke, cedar, pine, juniper, lemon zest, roasted walnut, red apple, orange zest, caramel, camphor, eucalyptus, leather, and molasses. Hints of cinnamon, clove, black pepper, eucalyptus, banana, red grape, plum, smoke, and anise could also be detected. As the tea faded, the liquor emphasized notes of minerals, cream, caramel, roasted cashew, roasted almond, baked bread, malt, vanilla, and butter that were chased by lingering hints of roasted peanut, honey, roasted walnut, sugarcane, lemon zest, orange zest, molasses, pine, camphor, and leather.

Feng Qing Dian Hong is almost always a complex, deep, and incredibly interesting tea, and that was certainly the case with this particular offering. I loved the way all of its aroma and flavor components worked together harmoniously, and I also must add that the tea liquor was appropriately full-bodied and richly textured in the mouth. Teas like this one, while providing a great overall drinking experience, would probably be too complex and demanding for someone just getting into Yunnan black teas, but for experienced drinkers, especially those who are established fans of Feng Qing teas, these are the sorts of offerings that are tremendously rewarding. If you are a fan of Feng Qing black teas, this is one to check out, and no, it really had not lost much of anything in storage.

Flavors: Almond, Anise, banana, Black Pepper, Bread, Butter, Camphor, Caramel, Cedar, Cinnamon, Clove, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Earth, Eucalyptus, Grapes, Herbaceous, Honey, Leather, Lemon Zest, Malt, Mineral, Molasses, Nutty, Orange Zest, Peanut, Pine, Plum, Red Apple, Smoke, Sugarcane, Vanilla, Walnut

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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75
225 tasting notes

This is a tea without any flaws and any strengths. It looks good, it smells good, it has a large amount of golden tips. The taste is a very typical for a Dian Hong: bitter-sweet chocolate, malt, honey. Mild. Some moderately long chocolaty aftertaste.

No one will be disappointed by drinking it but nobody will get excited either: this tea is super generic and lacks any character. It’s inexpensive and thus potentially can be designated as a daily drinker Dian Hong, but I want more personality even in my daily drinkers.

Flavors: Chocolate, Honey, Malt

annie

disappointing dian hongs are honestly the most devastating things.

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