Imperial Grade Pure Bud Bi Luo Chun Green Tea * Spring 2018

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Green Tea
Flavors
Anise, Drying, Floral, Gardenias, Green Beans, Honey, Meat, Mineral, Peas, Pepper, Smooth, Spices, Vegetal
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Mastress Alita
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 30 sec 3 g 6 oz / 181 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

2 Own it Own it

3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I made some bolognese sauce with old hamburger. I have ragrets. Bi luo chun always makes me feel a little better when I have ragrets. Straight up, drinking this smooth, thick, mouth-watering tea...” Read full tasting note
    92
  • “Sampler Sipdown September! I’m trying out the other Bi Lou Chun I was gifted from Derk, thanks so much Derk! I’m attempting to do this gong fu style, using my shiboridashi, though I’m only using...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Yunnan Sourcing

Tender shoots of tea buds are plucked during the first flush of spring and then expertly processed by hand into these tightly rolled pure bud “pearls” of fresh tea.

Our Imperial Grade Bi Luo Chun was grown in the town of Mojiang in Simao. The tea varietal used is a hybrid of Assamica called Yunkang #100.

The taste of the tea is sweet, thick and vibrant. There is some slight astringency that counters the sweetness, lending it depth and complexity.

We recommend brewing with 90C water. One flash rinse (about 10 seconds), then brew for 15-20 seconds and enjoy! With each successive infusion add 15 seconds.

Spring 2018 harvest!

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

92
245 tasting notes

I made some bolognese sauce with old hamburger. I have ragrets. Bi luo chun always makes me feel a little better when I have ragrets.

Straight up, drinking this smooth, thick, mouth-watering tea is like eating a plate of southern style green beans with ham hock and a dash of black pepper, while sitting on some fresh spring grass with gardenias abloom. But it’s imperial grade so it’s light in flavor.

I love it.

(Western, 3g, 8oz, 175F, first steep 2 minutes, 3 total)

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec 3 g 8 OZ / 236 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

88
422 tasting notes

Sampler Sipdown September! I’m trying out the other Bi Lou Chun I was gifted from Derk, thanks so much Derk! I’m attempting to do this gong fu style, using my shiboridashi, though I’m only using half its capacity since I don’t feel like drinking two cuppas on each infusion, which comes out to about 70-75ml of liquid per infusion. Therefore I measured out my leaf keeping that amount of liquid in mind, and will still have enough of my sampler left to get to try this a few other ways, as well. Woot.

Gong fu / 2.2g /175F / 70ml / 30s|45s|60s|80s|90s|120s

On the first steep I got an aroma of green beans and anise, and the flavor was very in line with that; it was highly vegetal, with a strong savory bean taste containing notes of green beans and peapods, with a hint of anise spice on the finish. My second and third steeps brought out a much stronger anise aroma, and suddenly the tea smelled like a savory cooked meat, like a seasoned porked or bacon! Maybe my senses are just off because I’m on day three of a migraine attack, and that is entirely possible, but… I’m also tasting savory, peppery cooked bacon. And I have no complaints about that. Who doesn’t love bacon!? (Apologies to my Vegan BFF, but we all know you call yourselves Vegans because you are actually from a planet in the Vega star system, and therefore are aliens, not humans. Ya, we’re all onto you. I’m talking about actual humans here). On the fourth steep the aroma is more peppery, and the flavor turned more vegetal, a bit like watery greens, with just a bit of a floral sweetness, and then right at the finish a mixed pepper/anise spice note comes out on the back of the tongue. The fifth and sixth steeps were very sweet and floral, with subtle honey and gardenia notes and a bit minerally. It felt like the tea was weakening by that point so I didn’t push it any further.

Western / 1.9g / 175F / 370ml / 2m|2m30s

The western brew is very sweet and floral, with a slight watery vegetal/green bean note toward the finish, and a very subtle hint of anise at the finish. The strong spice note I was getting before isn’t present, and the sweet flowery taste that only came out at the very end of the session is present right from the start. This is still fine with the more delicate flavor, but since I really liked that spiced bacon flavor mid-session, this is one I prefer gong fu style… because again, bacon! Since my leaves hadn’t fully unfurled in one western infusion I did resteep this just to see if a second infusion brought out any differences. The leaves were fully extended by this point, and the cup had a much stronger and less delicate overall profile, but I still tasted a honeyed/floral top note with a vegetal/beany finish. Very smooth, no bitterness, and a mild drying/astringent feel to the tongue after the sip.

Flavors: Anise, Drying, Floral, Gardenias, Green Beans, Honey, Meat, Mineral, Peas, Pepper, Smooth, Spices, Vegetal

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 g 2 OZ / 70 ML
derk

Ah, you’re welcome. Sounds like you enjoyed this one more than the other.

Mastress Alita

Used up my remainder on a cold steep which finished brewing today and I’m drinking in a refreshing cool glass with my dinner. Makes a fine iced tea as well; I’d say that iced it has a smooth watery vegetal taste, but I’m also getting a bit of the beany/bacon flavor in the finish.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.