Middle Mountain "Duck Shit Aroma" Dan Cong Oolong Tea * Spring 2018

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Apple, Blackberry, Bread, Butter, Cannabis, Cherry, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Cream, Cucumber, Custard, Earth, Eucalyptus, Fruity, Grapes, Grass, Herbaceous, Hibiscus, Lychee, Marshmallow, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange Zest, Orchid, Smoke, Spinach, Sugarcane, Watermelon
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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From Yunnan Sourcing

Ya Shi Xiang Dan Cong (aka Duck Shit Aroma) is a rare Dan Cong varietal grown in and around Ping Keng Tou village in the Phoenix Mountains outside of Chaozhou in Guangdong Province. This tea is from 50 to 150 year old tea bushes and trees!

It’s called “duck shit aroma” because in the Ping Keng Tou village area the soil has a somewhat yellow brown look to it and is unique to that area. With all teas the soil type is a key element in the tea’s taste. Villagers wanting to guard the uniqueness of their tea bushes told outsiders that the color and uniqueness of the soil in their village was due to copious amounts of duck shit and began to call the their Dan Cong “duck shit aroma”. True or not it’s an entertaining story which reveals why the tea has such a gross name.

The tea itself is lightly oxidized and the leaves are still mostly green in color. The brewed tea is highly aromatic with flower, honey and longan notes. The mouthfeel is delicate and soothing with a taste that perfectly balances sweet, bitter, and astringent notes, none of which are overpowering.

Incredibly tasty and powerful Duck Shit Aroma Dan Cong!

May 2018 Harvest

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1 Tasting Note

84
1031 tasting notes

Here is another of my late 2020/early 2021 Dancong oolong reviews. I think I actually finished what I had of this tea within two or three days of the Zhu Ye I just reviewed. I am guessing this because I did not have a ton of most of these teas (usually sample sizes), and I did not take any long breaks from drinking in either late 2020 or early 2021. Also, the notes for this tea are clustered with several other Dan Cong oolongs (the Zhu Ye being one of them) in my review notebook, so I must have consumed both within days of one another. This tea was a bit of an oddity. It had a lot to offer, but it was also a bit rougher and more unpredictable than some of the other Ya Shi Xiang I have tried over the years.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a 10 second rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 fluid ounces of 203 F water for 7 seconds. This infusion was followed by 16 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves produced aromas of black cherry, sugarcane, earth, cream, vanilla, and orchid. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of smoke, cannabis, wood, plum, and red grape. The first infusion added aromas of baked bread, grass, cucumber, and apple. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of roasted almond, grass, baked bread, red grape, black cherry, and cream that were balanced by hints of butter, orchid, sugarcane, smoke, cannabis, apple, earth, cinnamon, and nutmeg. The bulk of the subsequent infusions introduced aromas of roasted almond, lychee, nutmeg, marshmallow, custard, pomegranate, and longan that were underscored by subtle and consistent hibiscus and spinach scents. Stronger and more immediately detectable notes of butter, earth, apple, and sugarcane emerged in the mouth alongside notes of minerals, cucumber, orange zest, pomegranate, hibiscus, lychee, longan, vanilla, wood, marshmallow, custard, and caraway. Interesting hints of plum, roasted chestnut, spinach, eucalyptus, wintergreen, blackberry, and watermelon rind were present as well. As the tea faded, the liquor emphasized notes of minerals, baked bread, orange zest, cream, butter, vanilla, red grape, and black cherry that were chased by hints of blackberry, grass, cucumber, wood, earth, roasted almond, pomegranate, apple, caraway, sugarcane, wintergreen, and watermelon rind.

This tea was surprisingly complex, but it also struck me as being a bit prickly and at times overwhelming. Some of the aroma and flavor components could also be slightly unbalanced in places. Despite these nagging issues, this was still a very respectable offering. It was definitely worth a try.

Flavors: Almond, Apple, Blackberry, Bread, Butter, Cannabis, Cherry, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Cream, Cucumber, Custard, Earth, Eucalyptus, Fruity, Grapes, Grass, Herbaceous, Hibiscus, Lychee, Marshmallow, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange Zest, Orchid, Smoke, Spinach, Sugarcane, Watermelon

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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