2019 Yunnan Sourcing "Na Han Village" Old Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Berry, Bitter, Black Pepper, Bread, Brown Sugar, Cinnamon, Citrusy, Cloves, Coriander, Floral, Guava, Herbaceous, Herbs, Metallic, Mushrooms, Nutty, Spicy, Vegetables, Vegetal, Walnut
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 oz / 90 ml

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  • “As Scott mentions, this tea is strong, in its cha qi and bitterness, yet possesses a subtle complexity of flavours. Of course, that is nothing unusual for young sheng from ancient trees. Similarly,...” Read full tasting note
    82

From Yunnan Sourcing

Na Han Village (那罕寨) is located near Bang Dong village in the county Mengku, Lincang prefecture.Bang Dong is a small village situated at an altitude of 1750 meters. Our production is made entirely from the tea picked by one family’s small ancestral tea garden. The tea trees are 150-250 years of age and are growing naturally.

Na Han village area tea is very strong tea both in taste and cha qi. The bitterness is very noticeable, but softens after a few seconds in the mouth giving way to a sweet, vegetal taste and nice cooling and mouth-watering effect. This is very much due to the fact that this tea comes from older trees which convey a subtle but highly profound drinking experience.

Net Weight: 250 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)
Harvest time: April 2019
Harvest Area: Bang Dong village, Bang Dong county, Lincang Prefecture
Total Production amount: 40 kilograms

Wrapper Illustration by Patrik Benedičič

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

82
781 tasting notes

As Scott mentions, this tea is strong, in its cha qi and bitterness, yet possesses a subtle complexity of flavours. Of course, that is nothing unusual for young sheng from ancient trees. Similarly, one often finds these kind of teas to be less uniform in picking. There is a decent amount of large leaves and stalks here, which gives the tea a bit more of a huang pian like taste profile. However, frankly, I find it hard to focus on any of the specifics when drinking it. The center of the stage is exclusively reserved for the stoning and defocusing energy that takes over as soon as I get to the second infusion. After 3 days of working almost non-stop and being quite tense as a result, this is something I desperately needed.

In any case, here are some specifics I observed from the couple of sessions I’ve had with the tea. When dry, I can smell hints of gooseberry, walnut bread, and Oregon grape; after the rinse scent akin to cabbage, gnocchi, and coriander emerge. Interestingly, the empty cup aroma is not so much honey-like as is so common in young sheng. Instead, there are notes of chewing gum, brown sugar, cloves, and cinnamon.

The taste is vegetal and bitter throughout the session with the bitterness being almost reminiscent of Ye Sheng varietal at times. Various flavours of herbs (basil, curry leaves) and nuts show up here and there, with a mushroom note often present in the finish. Late infusions also have a nice guava-like sour edge to them.

The aftertaste is metallic and a bit like a citrusy Dan Cong oolong. There is a black pepper spiciness, long lasting floral fragrance, and a strong huigan as well. As for the mouthfeel, it seems to be of a milky kind, thick, and very smooth. The cooling sensation is fairly noticeable too.

Flavors: Berry, Bitter, Black Pepper, Bread, Brown Sugar, Cinnamon, Citrusy, Cloves, Coriander, Floral, Guava, Herbaceous, Herbs, Metallic, Mushrooms, Nutty, Spicy, Vegetables, Vegetal, Walnut

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 90 ML
derk

Have you had many Bangdong area sheng?

Togo

I can only remember one other one. Have you?

derk

Only 2, both distinctive yet they didn’t seem to share any characteristics. Something about your description of this one and my experiences with the other two is giving me an itch to hunt for a variety of sheng from Bangdong. Do you recall the other one you’ve tried?

Togo

I can’t remember any more than what this note describes: https://steepster.com/Togo/posts/378617

That was actually quite early in my pu’er exploration, it’s very hard to calibrate such old tastings with respect to the changing context/experience for me.

derk

Understood about the calibration :)

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