2014 Gao Jia Shan "Guan Gong" Fu Brick Tea from Hunan

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Autumn Leaf Pile, Cocoa, Dark Chocolate, Decayed Wood, Spices
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Bluegreen
Average preparation
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  • “I bought 50g off the original 1 kg brick. The pressed tea crumbles easily and is getting infused fast. Not much of a smell besides some vague decay. The taste is dark and gloomy: decayed wood, old...” Read full tasting note
    77

From Yunnan Sourcing

Wild Grown tea leaves from Gao Jia Mountain. This is the original An Hua tea varietal thats has grown in the mountains of Gao Jia Shan and Yun Tai Shan for centuries (maybe longer). Gao Jia Shan is both a place and the name of the tea factory brand that produced this lovely tea. Gao Jia Shan as a producer doesn’t have as long of a history as Yi Yang and Bai Sha Xi tea factories but nonetheless produces very high quality Fu Brick tea processed in the traditional manner.

The tea was fermented with a few days of wet piling, and then pressed into bricks. After pressing the golden flowers flourish in the inner section of the brick where the conditions are just right to support them. After a few days the Golden Flowers have thrived and spread throughout the inner part of the bricks, and then the bricks are dried gradually using a temperature of 37C which preserves gradually halts the spread of the flowers without damaging them or the tea leaves.

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1 Tasting Note

77
225 tasting notes

I bought 50g off the original 1 kg brick. The pressed tea crumbles easily and is getting infused fast. Not much of a smell besides some vague decay.

The taste is dark and gloomy: decayed wood, old leaves, cocoa, muted dark chocolate, some undetermined expired spices. A barely perceptible touch of the honeyed sweetness mercifully enlivens this somber affair. Finally, this tea has a powerful and lasting aftertaste of stale dark chocolate and last-year leaves – for those who are into this kind of things.

This is decidedly not my kind of tea. Drinking it on on a cold, clammy November morning is coming uncomfortably close to the monastic mortification of the flesh and spirit.

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Cocoa, Dark Chocolate, Decayed Wood, Spices

Shae

Love your description! This sounds like a perfect tea for Halloween.

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