Gu Yun 2008 Taiwanese High Mt. Aged Tea Loose Leaves

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong, Oolong Tea, Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Char, Decayed wood, Honey, Mineral, Oak wood, Roasted, Smoke, Smooth, Wood
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Low
Certification
Fair Trade, Vegan
Edit tea info Last updated by jLteaco
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 oz / 74 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Yay! The Great Steepster Freeze of 2020 is finally over! I’m glad all my notes were actually saved and I don’t need to repost them. I haven’t tried too many aged teas, so this is a learning...” Read full tasting note
    79
  • “This tea is fascinating. An aged oolong, it was harvested in 2008, and was repeatedly roasted and stored. The aroma of the dry leaf is mostly of wood, charcoal, and minerals. I prepared this tea in...” Read full tasting note
    98

From jLteaco (fongmongtea)

Hand plucked and aged since 2008, was a fine tea at the time it was produced, this aged tea develops brown-black tea leaves as it is dry. In the process of becoming an old tea, the tea was repeatedly roasted (in order to eliminate excess moisture and odor), and the tea leaves are conducting with Maillard reaction to produce a large amount of gallic acid.
The liquor it produces promises the notes of smokey, burn wood, and subtle sweet aftertaste (fruit acid). Firstly tasted mellow with the mild fragrance and then a sweet aftertaste quickly rising from the throat. This tea is perfect for people who prefer the aged taste (after chemical transformation) of oolong tea, drinking Aged Oolong Tea is definitely an exclusive choice and also an enjoyable lifestyle for all tea lovers.

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2 Tasting Notes

79
225 tasting notes

Yay! The Great Steepster Freeze of 2020 is finally over! I’m glad all my notes were actually saved and I don’t need to repost them.

I haven’t tried too many aged teas, so this is a learning experience. Thanks to Fong Mong for the sample. I didn’t know how to steep this tea, so I used my old parameters of all 7 g, 120 ml, 200F, and rounds of 25, 20, 25, 30, 30, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds, plus a few long steeps.

The dry aroma is of old wood, char, and roast. The first steep has notes of oak, sandalwood, chicory, minerals, and roast. The roast and minerals get stronger in steep two, and a honey element emerges. The flavours keep getting more intense as the session continues, and there’s definitely a bit of decayed wood in there, too. Generally, this is a smooth, woody tea with a sophisticated profile. The smoke and roast are more noticeable in later rounds, but this tea doesn’t evolve too much over the session.

While it’s not something I’d typically drink, I enjoyed this aged oolong for its exotic woodiness and smoothness. As khboyd said in a review, it reminds me of a Wuyi oolong. I’m sure it would have been even better in the fall or winter. I can’t wait for this unusually hot summer to end, not least because drinking hot tea in this heat is kind of annoying.

Flavors: Char, Decayed wood, Honey, Mineral, Oak wood, Roasted, Smoke, Smooth, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 7 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
White Antlers

Eh! Drinking hot tea in August IS annoying! I was desperate this morning so I was forced to drink a hot cuppa, which was not the torture I thought it would be.

Leafhopper

We’ve had some days that were over 30C here in Ontario, but I tend not to cold brew because it requires more leaf and I don’t get as many resteeps. I guess I’d rather save money than have cold tea. I do, however, sometimes cold brew old teas I want to get rid of.

White Antlers

I generally will brew a big pot of hot tea at night as I am doing the dinner dishes, pour it into a jug and chill it overnight. That way I can get a few hot brews out of the leaves without having to cold brew-which I also think is a waste and does not taste as good as hot brew that’s chilled. It’s been consistently over 32.22C here (90s Fahrenheit) on the U.S. East coast with 98% humidity. We had tornadoes yesterday-and even they did not cool it off. I made sure to brew up tea after dinner so I can have a big, cold glass tomorrow at breakfast.

Leafhopper

Yikes, that’s hot! I’ve also made hot tea and then put it in the fridge. I’m not sure if it makes more tea than cold steeping; I might have to do a comparison. I actually haven’t made a big Western pot of tea in quite a while. I usually do gongfu sessions or steep it in a mug using a Finum infuser.

White Antlers

I am a tea barbarian. That is one reason why I don’t review. When I first tried pu erh, I would put a chunk in 2 cups of water in a Pyrex measuring cup then put that in the microwave for 2 minutes. I brew Western 95% of the time. To me, tea just tastes like tea. I so love these lyrical tasting notes folks write and wish I could get all that from my tea. So I get it vicariously here instead.

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98
25 tasting notes

This tea is fascinating. An aged oolong, it was harvested in 2008, and was repeatedly roasted and stored. The aroma of the dry leaf is mostly of wood, charcoal, and minerals. I prepared this tea in a gaiwan, using approximately 2g of leaf for this tasting, and beginning with 30ml of water at around 90 degrees Celsius. I rinsed the leaves before infusing. I should note that a Yixing teapot is recommended for this type of tea, however, I don’t own one yet, so gaiwan it is.

For the first infusion, I let it sit for 20 seconds, and then added 10 seconds with each infusion. This oolong really reminds me of rock tea. I also notice the leaves don’t open quite as much as other oolong, but the flavour certainly does come out. The liquor s dark reddish brown, and it’s astringent, most noticed at the back of the mouth and throat. Flavour wise, this tea tastes robustly woody and smokey, a bit of charcoal and minerals with an interesting honey-like note in the aftertaste. The aftertaste is substantial and lingering.

I continued for 10 infusions, noticing that the flavours are quite consistent over time. The wood and smoke notes do mellow and by the final few infusions I tasted more minerals. This was an intriguing taste experience!

Flavors: Char, Mineral, Smoke, Wood

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 2 g 1 OZ / 30 ML

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