Shanlinxi High Mountain Baked Oolong Tea, Lot 386

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Baked Bread, Butter, Char, Cream, Cucumber, Grass, Herbaceous, Lettuce, Mineral, Peanut, Pear, Plums, Sugarcane, Toasted Rice, Umami, Vanilla, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Here is another tea from the backlog. It was the last tea in my Shanlinxi sampler that I ended up trying. I think I either finished it around the end of May or start of June. Shanlinxi is quite...” Read full tasting note
    88
  • “This baked Shanlinxi High Mountain Oolong Lot 386 tastes like a hybrid between an Taiwanese oolong and a Wuyi Baijiguan oolong. Very nutty in a fusion between hazelnuts, almond plus a fine hint of...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Taiwan Tea Crafts

We like to say that this superb high mountain tea terroir is just up the mountain from us. Ok, maybe a few mountains away up, but we are very proud to say that Shanlinxi has developed into one of the highly reputed growing areas in our own Nantou County, and rightfully so. The spectacular tea gardens are situated at an elevation of 1600 to 1800 meters and some of them have such vertiginous inclines that mountaineering equipment is required to go and pick the leaves. Shanlinxi oolong distinguishes itself from other Gao Shan oolongs in that it features clearly defined balsam notes that make it particularly appealing to the palate and nose. Many say that the luxuriant fir tree forests surrounding the gardens have something to do in conveying this fresh evergreen feeling in the cup. This particular Lot 407 is a Single Estate Tea from Longfengxia. This batch was then masterfully slow baked by our resident Tea Master on the lighter side and in three different steps to preserve the aromatics of high mountain teas and coat it with a luxuriously thick wild honey sweetness that is simply enthralling. The balsam notes are still there but have gained a spiciness that is quite alluring. This is one of the most generous teas we propose. It is easily a 9/10 on our addiction scale. If you liked our Lot 270, you will be in good company with this one.

About Taiwan Tea Crafts View company

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2 Tasting Notes

88
820 tasting notes

Here is another tea from the backlog. It was the last tea in my Shanlinxi sampler that I ended up trying. I think I either finished it around the end of May or start of June. Shanlinxi is quite famous for its jade oolongs, and admiteddly, those are the Shanlinxi teas with which I am most familiar. I have to say, though, that I found this roasted oolong to be very good. It was certainly a pleasant change of pace from the more typical Shanlinxi offerings.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of rolled tea leaves in 4 ounces of 195 F water for 10 seconds. This infusion was chased by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves produced aromas of char, baked bread, wood, and roasted peanut. After the rinse, I picked up new aromas of cream, butter, and toasted rice. The first infusion did not really add anything new. In the mouth, I detected subtle notes of char, cream, butter, toasted rice, and roasted peanut that were chased by vegetal undercurrents and some vague sweetness on the swallow. Subsequent infusions introduced hints of umami, stone fruit, and sugarcane on the nose. Wood came out in the mouth along with new flavors of minerals, umami, cooked lettuce, grass, cucumber, sugarcane, vanilla, pear, and plum. The final infusions offered lingering mineral, toasted rice, cream, and butter notes that were backed by hints of grass, pear, and belatedly emerging juniper.

All in all, this was a very good roasted oolong. The roast was not that heavy, so some of the tea’s more vegetal qualities were quite evident. It was very well-balanced in the mouth with good body and respectable longevity too. I suppose I will have to try a few more teas of this type in the near future because this one surprised and impressed me.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Butter, Char, Cream, Cucumber, Grass, Herbaceous, Lettuce, Mineral, Peanut, Pear, Plums, Sugarcane, Toasted Rice, Umami, Vanilla, Wood

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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88
72 tasting notes

This baked Shanlinxi High Mountain Oolong Lot 386 tastes like a hybrid between an Taiwanese oolong and a Wuyi Baijiguan oolong. Very nutty in a fusion between hazelnuts, almond plus a fine hint of pine nuts. There is also a slightly astringency something metallic to it. The scent covers a thick honey-ish layer which directly leads to the woodsy undertones and a delicious flair of freshly baked steaming wholemeal bread taste. But this isn’t the whole show. A very balsamic note directly explodes on your tasting buds and fires up directly through your nose – cooling and tingling. But you can also experience this minty flair very distinct in your throat like if you were chewing a cough candy. Later onward much more nutty tones but now more like hazelnut cream are the center of this well composed symphony sharing the space with a subtle note of banana and warm waffles. This was a very tasteful, rich and long lasting fellow with a very warming and cozy feeling to it.

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