Green Kukicha - Organic Green Tea

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Grass, Hay, Sweet
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by ~lauren.
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec 17 oz / 500 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

6 Own it Own it

5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The first time I had a good cup of Japanese green tea I was all, “Whoa! Do they put seaweed in this! Yum!” I’ve always loved seaweed. Those kids who made faces at me when I had my yummy seaweed...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “This is a smooth, very tasty cup of tea! Sweeter than other green teas I’ve had. Still has a slightly crisp finish, but it’s so smooth! Thanks to Batrachoid for letting me try.” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “sugoi fruity desu yo! The leaves and twigs do smell of fruit (possibly mango) but that lies beneath the more prominent smell hay & grass. The smell is pretty exciting leading up to actually...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “Revising this to add that I finished it and it’s sipdown no. 4 of 2017 (no. 285 total) because the page appears to be broken. The note below was from tasting last week. When I last got derailed...” Read full tasting note
    76

From The Tao of Tea

Native Name: Senkukicha
Origin: Japan

Plucking Season: Late Spring

Introduction: Also known as Senkukicha. This tea is a non-roasted green version of Kukicha with a creamy sweet flavor similar to mangoes. Clear bright green brew. Low in caffeine.

Flavor Profile: Sweet, fruity, oceanic aroma and smooth, grassy-sweet flavor.

Ingredients: 100% Organic Green Tea Leaves
Certified Organic by: Quality Assurance International (QAI)

Brewing Suggestions
Water Temp 150°F-170°F (66°C-77°C)

Quantity of Leaf (1 tsp / 8oz water)

Steep Time (minutes) 2 – 3 minutes

Infusions 2 – 3

Japanese green teas have by far the most delicate, sensitive leaf and are some of the most challenging (and rewarding) teas to brew. However, larger leaf Bancha as well as roasted teas like Houjicha and Kukicha can use slightly higher temperature water and longer steeping times. We recommend using water at 150 to 170 F and steeping one teaspoon of leaf per 8 ounce cup for 2 to 3 minutes. This method provides 2 to 3 satisfying infusions. Japanese green teas can be enjoyed in a variety of brewing styles but are traditionally steeped in a kyushu (a small, side-handle pot).

About The Tao of Tea View company

Company description not available.

5 Tasting Notes

80
525 tasting notes

The first time I had a good cup of Japanese green tea I was all, “Whoa! Do they put seaweed in this! Yum!” I’ve always loved seaweed. Those kids who made faces at me when I had my yummy seaweed snacks are probably eating sushi these days. hah!

So anyway. I love seaweedy Japanese greens. It’s the last of my sample from Batrachoid. sad. It’s tastes a lot more savory this time. Seaweed and hay. And most importantly, warm. I wish I could drink from my toes cause they are freeeezing! Now I want sushi.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

80
603 tasting notes

This is a smooth, very tasty cup of tea! Sweeter than other green teas I’ve had. Still has a slightly crisp finish, but it’s so smooth! Thanks to Batrachoid for letting me try.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

86
39 tasting notes

sugoi fruity desu yo! The leaves and twigs do smell of fruit (possibly mango) but that lies beneath the more prominent smell hay & grass. The smell is pretty exciting leading up to actually drinking the tea.

Alright, I don’t taste any remnants of the sweet smell, and sencha of course comes to mind immediately, but with a dry aftertaste of malt. It’s a great morning tea.

I only purchased 1 oz but I will buy this tea again with the regular 3 oz tin; it’s that good.

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 30 sec

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

76
1247 tasting notes

Revising this to add that I finished it and it’s sipdown no. 4 of 2017 (no. 285 total) because the page appears to be broken. The note below was from tasting last week.

When I last got derailed from my serial obsession with tea into some other obsession for a while, I believe I had picked this one as my next “take it to work” tea.

When I started my new job, which isn’t so new anymore (I’ve been there more than 18 months), I started taking a Timolino of green tea to work every day. Then I discovered that the company made Numi teas available in bags, and they had a couple of greens so I got lazy and stopped making the tea before I went into work. Instead, I started making it at work. After a while, I started to get tired of the two greens, then I stopped drinking tea for a while.

Which brings us to yesterday, when I went back to trying to establish the Timolino habit. I think I had had this before but I hadn’t ever written a note about it.

Now, unfortunately, like pretty much all of my tea it is rather far past it’s “tastes best by” date, but I’ve never let that stop me before. The dry leaves range in color from a medium-dark green to a silvery green and they’re geometric and stick like. They remind me of what herbals with lemon grass in them look like. They have a sweet, grassy, almost haylike smell.

The tea is a dark golden color and clear. It has a grassy, sweet aroma.

It tastes pretty much like it smells. Rather refreshing without being too drying in the mouth. It’ll be a pleasant commuting tea for as long as it lasts. I could see buying something like this again, maybe. Hard to know at this point as I don’t ever see myself buying more tea given how much I still have.

Flavors: Grass, Hay, Sweet

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 min, 30 sec 2 tsp 17 OZ / 500 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .