White Peony (High Grade)

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
White Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Apricot, Autumn Leaf Pile, Butter, Cinnamon, Cream, Dates, Eucalyptus, Hay, Herbaceous, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Oats, Peanut, Pine, Raisins, Smoke, Straw, White Grapes
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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  • “Okay, here comes the final review of the day. This was another recent white tea sipdown. I think I finished the last of my one ounce pouch of this tea two or three days ago. Some of you may recall...” Read full tasting note
    90

From The Tao of Tea

This high grade White Peony is grown at a small tea farm in Zhenghe, Fujian, China. Zhenghe is regarded as the original and oldest area for white tea cultivation in China. The plant cultivars in the area produce considerable amounts of down, ‘white-silvery hair,’ on the leaf buds. It is this down that gives the brew its buttery, smooth texture.

White Peony is made in the month of April each year. Only the newly sprouted ‘buds’ and young leaves of the tea plant are used. Several grades are available in the tea industry and it is also common now to find White Peony teas made in other regions in China. After the leaves are plucked, they are dried on bamboo trays.

About The Tao of Tea View company

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1 Tasting Note

90
824 tasting notes

Okay, here comes the final review of the day. This was another recent white tea sipdown. I think I finished the last of my one ounce pouch of this tea two or three days ago. Some of you may recall my disdain for The Tao of Tea’s entry level Bai Mudan, but this one was great. I had no serious issues with it.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose leaf and bud mix in 4 ounces of 176 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was chased by 18 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry leaf and bud blend produced subtle aromas of hay, cinnamon, pine, and smoke. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of almond, straw, and cream. The first infusion brought out a hint of peanut on the nose. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of cream, hay, pine, cinnamon, almond, and peanut that were backed by smoke, oat, and eucalyptus hints. Subsequent infusions saw a peony-like floral aroma make itself known alongside mineral, eucalyptus, and autumn leaf scents. There was a stronger cinnamon presence as well. In the mouth, I found stronger, more distinctive eucalyptus notes as well as impressions of golden raisin, autumn leaf pile, butter, minerals, birch, date, apricot, white grape, and lemon zest. The lengthier later infusions retained mineral, autumn leaf pile, straw, cream, and hay notes that were balanced by subtle lemon zest, butter, almond, peanut, and golden raisin characteristics.

This was another wonderful Fujianese Bai Mudan. It is a shame that it is either out of stock or no longer offered. Considering that I only paid around $4.00 for it, I was expecting another grassy, overly smoky, and relatively unattractive tea with plenty of broken leaf and bud material, but instead, I ended up with a gorgeous, silvery leaf and bud mix that was mostly intact and produced a wonderful, easy-drinking tea liquor with tremendous character. Go figure.

Flavors: Almond, Apricot, Autumn Leaf Pile, Butter, Cinnamon, Cream, Dates, Eucalyptus, Hay, Herbaceous, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Oats, Peanut, Pine, Raisins, Smoke, Straw, White Grapes

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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